Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Grandpa Debs Webster's Petition for Naturalization

Debs Warren Webster
Debs Warren Webster

The other day I noticed a shaky leaf hint on Ancestry.com for my maternal grandfather, Debs Warren Webster. I clicked on the leaf and found a new-to-me record. Before I tell you about this record, here's a little background first for my new readers. My Grandpa Debs was born in Brazil. He was the son of an American father, Watson (Frederick) Emory Webster, and a Mexican mother, Esther Matus Villatoro.

Frederick and Esther immigrated to Brazil and that's where Debs and his younger siblings were born. Debs' daughter (my mom) was also born in Brazil. In the summer of 1952,  Debs and his family (including my mom) immigrated to the United States by way of the ocean liner SS Brazil.

Sometime after they arrived in New York, they bought a car and some camping equipment and traveled across the United States toward their final destination in Southern California. Along the way they bought postcards and took pictures. I've shared many blog posts about their immigration trip. There's a tab at the top of my blog titled The Debs Webster Family Immigration Story that is dedicated to their trip.

Okay. Back to the document that Ancestry.com found for me. Here it is. It's Debs' Petition for Naturalization. I've blurred the witnesses' names for privacy reasons.


Petitions for Naturalization are also referred to as Second or Final Papers.

Here's the back of Debs' Petition for Naturalization.


Information gleaned from this document:
  1. Full name: Debs Warren Webster
  2. Present place of residence: 16066 La Monde St., Hacienda Heights, LA, Calif. 91745 [I remember their home at this address from the many times we visited my grandparents.]
  3. Birth date: April 27, 1914
  4. Birth place: Santos, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil
  5. Married: Yes [I know he was married. I'm assuming that "not" would be placed before the word married for petitioners who were not married]
  6. Number of children: 3
  7. Lawfully admitted to the United States on July 21, 1952
  8. Present nationality: Brazil
  9. Alien registration number: A8 347 028 ca
  10. He changed is name to: Warren Debs Webster
  11. Witnesses personally knew Debs since at least: March 1, 1968
  12. Petition was filed at: U.S. District Court at in Los Angeles, Calif.
  13. Petition filed on: March 16, 1973
  14. Petition granted and Certificate Number: 9562177
Besides all of this wonderful information, my grandfather's signatures are also on this document. I think it's very interesting that my grandfather signed his name as "Debs Warren Webster" first. And when he signed the Oath of Allegiance he signed his name as "Warren Debs Webster." I'm assuming this is because he had requested his name be changed on the petition. And once that was granted, he signed his Oath with his newly changed name. 

This document was found in the California, Naturalization Records, 1887-1991 record set on Ancestry.com. If you'd like to search for your ancestors in this record set, click HERE.

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, June 26, 2015

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for June 26, 2015

IMG_0269 
My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Have You Used this Unusual Genealogy Resource? by Lorine McGinnis Schulze for Legacy Family Tree News
  2. The Jollett Book Is In by Wendy Mathias, author of Jollett Etc.
  3. The elitist, the snob, the know-it-all and those that are just plain rude. by Jenna Mills, author of Desperately Seeking Surnames
  4. It All Began 20 Years Ago... by Cyndi Ingle, author of Cyndi's List
  5. 'Down into the Darkness': Mental Illness & Family History by Jennifer Geraghty-Gorman, author of 'On a flesh and bone foundation': An Irish History
  6. How much can you fit in a month? by Janet Hovorka, author of The Chart Chick
  7. 5 Things to Do When Applying to a Lineage Society by Amy Johnson Crow, author of Amy Johnson Crow Blog
  8. A HOSPITAL DIRECTORY CLUE by Molly Charboneau, author of Molly's Canopy
  9. Recording internet database searches AND Jazzing up Legacy reports by Michele Simmons Lewis, author of Ancestoring
  10. Don't Forget the Coops -- Farming and Agricultural Records for Genealogy by James Tanner, author of Genealogy's Star
  11. Keeping track of all of those to do's! by Shannon Thomas, author of Our Life Picture by Picture
  12. Grandma's Hug by Amy Archibald, author of Revealing Roots and Branches
  13. Pinterest for Genealogists! AND Tuesday’s Genealogy Tip – The 1840 Census by Lisa Lisson, author of Are You My Cousin?
  14. Grandma Foster and her Apprentice by Michelle Ganus Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
  15. 52 Weeks of Selfies: Week 1 by Heather Wylie, author of An Unexpected Discovery
  16. Take obituaries with a grain of salt by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
  17. Crowd Control and Genealogy - What Would You Do? by Jacquie Schattner, author of Seeds to Tree
  18. FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY–After you return home….then what? by Diane Gould Hall, author of MICHIGAN FAMILY TRAILS
  19. Black Sheep Ancestors by Niki Davis, author of Rooted in Foods
  20. 20 Reasons You Should Blog Your Family History Book by Lynn Palermo, author of The Family History Writing Studio

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

"May I Introduce To You" Interviews on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discoveries
 
In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Place

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Decisions, Decisions ~ Choosing Which Classes to Take at the BYU Conference on Family History & Genealogy 2015


As I announced in a previous post, I've been asked to be an official conference blogger for the upcoming BYU Conference on Family History & Genealogy. I've been looking at the schedule of classes offered at the conference, and there are so many awesome classes to choose from that it's hard to decide which ones to attend.

I've printed out the conference schedule and have circled some classes I'm very interested in, but even with that, I've noticed that during some of the time slots, I've circled two classes. Uh oh. I need to decide which one to take.

Thankfully, there's still time to decide. The BYU Conference on Family History & Genealogy begins on Tuesday, July 28 and ends on Friday, July 31. I still have five weeks to decide.

Here's the list of tracks offered at the conference:

Tuesday, July 28th

  • ICAPGen
  • Beginner
  • Methodology
  • U.S./Canada Research
  • German Research
  • Online Research
  • Writing/Publishing Family History
  • FamilySearch

Wednesday, July 29th

  • ICAPGen
  • Online
  • DNA Research
  • U.S./Canada Research
  • British Isles Research
  • Preserving Family History
  • Finding Stories
  • Technology/Tools

Thursday, July 30th

  • Methodology
  • Immigration and Emigration
  • International Research
  • LDS Ancestral Research
  • Scandinavian Research
  • Technology/Tools
  • Military Records
  • Vendor

Friday, July 31st

  • Vendor
  • Land/Probate Records
  • Methodology
  • U.S./Canada Research
  • British Research
  • Computers & Technology
  • FamilySearch
  • FamilySearch Consultants

Don't these tracks sound awesome? Four days of amazing tracks and classes to choose from.

Here's an example of my dilemma. On Tuesday two classes are offered at the same time after lunch: "Fun With...Citing Sources!" taught by Jean Wilcox Hibben and "Ohio: Crossroads to the West" taught by Kory L. Meyerink. I have ancestors from Ohio, but I'd also like to learn more about citing sources. See? What am I going to do?

And then there's this other example from Thursday: Should I take "Catholic Church Records in Latin America" taught by Arturo Cuellar or "It's Not All Online! Using Printed Sources for Scandinavian Research" taught by Ruth Maness? I have ancestors from Mexico and Brazil on my mom's side. I also have ancestors from Norway and Sweden on my dad's side. Again, I have a decision to make.

These are just two examples. I could give you others. But really, isn't this actually a great problem to have? This just shows the wonderful variety of classes offered at this conference.

I'm really excited about and looking forward to attending the BYU Conference on Family History & Genealogy

If you are interested in attending this wonderful conference, it's not too late to register. Just click on the following link to go to the conference website.

And to see the conference class schedule, click on the "Schedule" tab at the top of the BYU Conference website and then click "Conference Schedule," or you can just click the link below.

I'd love to know if you are also planning on attending this conference. If you are, please let me know in the comments below.

Thanks for reading!



© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Saturday, June 20, 2015

Father's Day 2015

Happy Father's Day! 

This is a photo of my dad, Jan Albert Iverson, holding one of my younger brothers and me. I'm on the left in this photo.


My dad was a great dad and was a very hard worker. He went to college while my brothers and I were young. He attended in the evenings after working at his full-time job. I don't know how he did all of this or when he had time to do his homework. He first attended college at San Francisco City College. Our family moved from San Francisco to Redwood City, so he continued his schooling at San Mateo Junior College. Several years later, we moved to San Jose. In his personal history my dad wrote the following about this time in his life:

"I continued my college at night, receiving my Associate of Arts Degree in Social Arts. The time away from my family was tough. I so missed the children growing up. I would really only see them on weekends as I would come home most of the time on the train and go right to school, coming home after ten o'clock in the evening."
"I began my work with Chevron Chemical (Standard Oil) Co. in Accounting. Later, I moved over to Chevron Shipping Co. as a Data Processing Assistant. Computer Service Department centralized and took everyone but me. Therefore, I was doing everything I had done before and was required to do some of the work the programmers had done before. I therefore, went to night school for two years at City College of San Jose to get trained in computers."
"My training resulted in a position with Chevron Information Technology Division as a Programmer Analyst."

I'm so thankful for my dad. I wish I could tell him that in person on this Father's Day. Unfortunately, he passed away six years ago. We sure do miss you Dad!


I absolutely love this photo of my husband Brent holding our daughter. He was working on homework for one of his college classes at the time. My husband was in college full-time for the first four years of our marriage. We had two children by the time he graduated with his degree in Electrical Engineering. He's a wonderful husband and a great father to our five children. And I'm so thankful for him too.

I found this very special video on Mormon Channel's YouTube channel. It's called Earthly Father, Heavenly Father. I hope you enjoy watching it.


I am eternally grateful for my earthly father, Jan Albert Iverson, for my husband Brent, who's the father of our five children, and for my Heavenly Father.

Happy Father's Day!

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, June 19, 2015

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for June 19, 2015


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Self-Publishing or "How to Start and Start Again" by Wendy Mathias, author of Jollett Etc.
  2. Legacy Family Tree Announcement by Michele Simmons Lewis, author of Ancestoring
  3. Faces from the Past and Present: Family Similarities in the McKenzie, Burt and Hawley Families by Rebecca Walbecq, author of Genealogist on a Journey
  4. Breaking Through the 1870 Brick Wall: The Significance of the Freedmen’s Bureau Records by Thom Reed for FamilySearch Blog
  5. Thank you, BLM! AND New: DiscoverFreedmen by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
  6. Ask a Family History Consultant, They Can Help You by Devon Lee, author of A Patient Genealogist
  7. Fascinating Family Finds: Land Patents by Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, author of Genealogical Gems
  8. Using Funeral Home Records for Genealogy by Christine Woodcock for Geneosity Blog
  9. Many many libraries, archives, institutions and other entities have an online presence! Are you taking advantage? by Diane L. Richard for UPFRONT WITH NGS
  10. 52 Ancestors Week 24-Heirlooms~Treasures to Me  by Cheri Hudson Passey, author of Carolina Girl Genealogy
  11. 6 Types of Info Found In Your Ancestor’s Will by Lisa Lisson, author of Lisa Lisson – Genealogist, Blogger, Etsypreneur
  12. RUNAWAY HUSBAND - There's No Hiding The Family Skeletons in the News! by Sharn White, author of FamilyHistory4u
  13. Choosing A Genealogy Travel Guide by Lynn Palermo, author of The Armchair Genealogist
  14. Crista Cowan's Interview: "Career Spotlight: What I Do As a Genealogist" by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  15. BYU Conference on Family History and Genealogy by Ancestry Insider, author of The Ancestry Insider
  16. 5 Interview Techniques to Take Your Family History to the Next Level by Tara Cajacob for NextGen Genealogy Network Blog
  17. I’m Not Who I Think I Am by ljacobs63, author of NO STONE UNTURNED
  18. They died of what? Causes of death found in the 1800's records by Jeanie Roberts, author of The Family Connection
  19. Portraits in Souvenir Programs by Joanne Cowden, author of Researching Relatives
  20. 11 Do’s and Don’ts of Writing Family Biographies by Elly for The LegacyTree Genealogists Blog
  21. Copyright Infringement or Common Occurance? by Nancy Messier, author of My Ancestors and Me
 
The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

"May I Introduce To You" Interviews on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed It….My Contribution to the Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Land Patent

Judy Russell, The Legal Genealogist, recently published a blog post titled Thank you, BLM!. Her blog post got me thinking about when I searched for the land record of my great-grandfather Watson (Frederick) Emory Webster, a.k.a. "The Traveling Dentist" here on my blog. I had found that he purchased land in Rooks County, Kansas in 1894. I'll share more about that in a future post.

While searching the Bureau of Land Management website again yesterday, I was delighted to find the land patent of my 2nd great-grandfather, Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster, who was Watson's father.1


Ebenezer was born in Racine, Meigs, Ohio on 11 August 1838. He served in the US Civil War in Company E, 74th Regiment, Illinois Infantry. According to census records, Ebenezer and his family moved to Kansas sometime before 1880. In the 1880 US census he and his family were living in Otoe Reservation, Marshall, Kansas.2 By March of 1885 he and his family were living in Marysville, Marshall, Kansas.3

Ebenezer's land patent was issued on 30 June 1884 and consisted of 160 acres. Here's a zoomed in view of Ebenezer's land.


The boundaries for Ebenezer's land were Arrowhead Road, 5th Road, 6th Road and Bison Road. I was curious to see what that area in Kansas looks like today so I turned to Google Maps. Here's what I found.


Ebenezer's land is inside the red square. Indian Creek ran through his land and there was a pond or small lake as well. There isn't a name for this body of water on the Google Maps website.

Here's what the land looks like when I turned on the "Earth" feature on Google Maps.


It looks like there are two homes within this piece of property. I wonder who owns the land now.

The map of Ebenezer's property isn't the only thing I found. See the tab at the top of the BLM website that says "Patent Image?" I clicked on that and found the Land Patent document, which as you can see, can be downloaded as a PDF file. Of course, I did download the document.


If you'd like to search for Land Patents on the BLM website, click HERE. And to learn more about Land Patent Searches on the FamilySearch Wiki, click HERE.

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved



1 Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster (Kansas), Accession No. NE0170_.338, 30 June 1884; “Land Patent Search,” digital images, General Land Office Records (http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/search/default.aspx : accessed 15 June 2015).

2 "United States Census, 1880," Database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MF5H-BB7 : accessed 16 June 2015), E P Webster, Otoe Reservation, Marshall, Kansas, United States; citing enumeration district , sheet , NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll ; FHL microfilm

3 Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, Kansas; 1885 Kansas Territory Census; Roll: KS1885_86; Line: 8; Ancestry.com. Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009.

Friday, June 12, 2015

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for June 12, 2015

My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. A Marker and a Memory~ When Did Her Father Die? by Cheri Hudson Passey for Worldwide Genealogy  ~ A Genealogical Collaboration
  2. Global Family Reunion Block Party - Salt Lake City by Amy Archibald, author of Revealing Roots and Branches
  3. Introducing Jennifer Holik, Guest Genealogist by Lorine McGinnis Schulze, author of The Olive Tree Genealogy
  4. Canadian Resources I Use by Barbara Poole, author of Life From The Roots
  5. Tuesday’s Tip: Tenants in Common vs. Joint Tenants by Jenny Lanctot, author of Are My Roots Showing?
  6. My Great Grandmother Used Social Media AND Reminders of Some Genealogy Research Basics by Lisa Lisson, author of Lisa Lisson
  7. Jewish Research Tips, Part 1: History and Immigration by Marissa for LegacyTree Genealogists Blog
  8. Mothers Helping Mothers by Michelle Ganus Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
  9. Genealogy and Elitism: It Isn’t What You Say, It’s How You Say It by Amy Johnson Crow, author of Amy Johnson Crow
  10. Couldn't Attend the Global Family Reunion -- No Worries -- Select Sessions Recorded & Available to Watch by Diane L. Richard for UPFRONT WITH NGS
  11. FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY TRIP - Day 1 by Diane Gould Hall, author of MICHIGAN FAMILY TRAILS
  12. The Research Notebook by Diane Boumenot, author of One Rhode Island Family
  13. Bonds of War-a new blog on the economy of the Civil War by Daniel Sauerwein, author of Civil War History
  14. I’m Not Likin’ Lichen! by Laura Aanenson, author of where2look4ancestors
  15. Now Connect to Your DNA Cousins in Canada and Australia by Anna Swayne for Ancestry.com Blog
  16. Early Migration Routes are Your “Yellow Brick Road” by Amie Bowser Tennant for RootsBid Blog
  17. Popular destinations per religion by Yvette Hoitink, author of DUTCH GENEALOGY
  18. TIME FOR A TIMELINE: A DOWNLOADABLE TEMPLATE FOR YOU by Dayna Jacobs, author of On Granny's Trail
  19. Sepia Saturday: Mayhem in the Tunnel by Wendy Mathias, author of Jollett Etc.
  20. Flag Day: Our Family’s Unofficial Flag by Colleen G. Brown Pasquale, author of Leaves & Branches

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

"May I Introduce To You" Interviews on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed It….My Contribution to the Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Great-Grandpa Carl Gillberg's WWII Draft Registration Card


Carl Albert Gillberg

While I was exploring Ancestry.com's new website (which I really like by the way), I was surprised to find the WWII Draft Registration Card for my paternal great-grandfather, Carl Albert Gillberg.1


This was new information for me. I had no idea Great-Grandpa Carl had registered for the draft during WWII. This draft registration was the Fourth Registration, also known as "the old man's registration."

Information gleaned from the front of this card:

Name: Carl Albert Gillberg
Place of Residence: 12306 Wicks St., Roscoe, Los Angeles, California
Mailing Address: Same as Place of Residence
Telephone: None [Well, that's interesting. They didn't have a phone.]
Age: 60
Place of Birth: Stockholm, Sweden
Date of Birth: January 8, 1882
Name and Address of Person Who Will Always Know Your Address: Jack McElroy - Same as 2 [Jack McElroy was Carl's son-in-law.]
Employer's Name and Address: Unemployed (Baker)

And of course, I love that I have Carl's signature on this document!

Here's the back of Carl's draft registration card.


It's wonderful that a physical description is included in these draft registration cards.

Information gleaned from the back of this card:

Race: White
Height: 5'8"
Weight: 180 pounds
Eye color: Blue
Hair color: Gray
Complexion: Light
Other obvious physical characteristics: Glasses, left forefinger missing
Date of registration: April 26, 1942

I already knew that Carl was missing part of his left forefinger because this fact was stated in Carl's two Declaration of Intention documents and in Carl's Certificate of Naturalization. In my post titled "Left Forefinger Off" I shared two photos of Carl that show this interesting characteristic.

Here's the link to Ancestry.com's database in which I found Carl's draft registration card ~ U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942. You may want to check it out to see if your ancestor is listed there too.

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved


1 World War II Draft Cards (4th Registration) for the State of California; State Headquarters: California; Microfilm Roll: 603155. Ancestry.com. U.S., World War II Draft Restration Cards, 1942 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Accessed 2 June 2015.

Friday, June 5, 2015

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for June 5, 2015


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Surprising Information Found in the Index to Court Order Books by Lisa Lisson, author of Lisa Lisson
  2. Why You Should Consider Applying to a Lineage Society AND Why You Should Download Your Files From Ancestry and Every Other Website by Amy Johnson Crow, author of Amy Johnson Crow
  3. News for Smallest Leaf: a new website and a new book! by Lisa, author of Small-leaved Shamrock
  4. All Michael’s Genealogy Blogs Have Moved by Michael John Neill, author of Genealogy Tip of the Day
  5. Records May Be Wrong Due to Stigma of Divorce AND Our Ancestors Didn't Travel Lightly by Joanne Cowden, author of Researching Relatives
  6. Excel trick by Michele Simmons Lewis, author of Ancestoring
  7. Casualty in The Blitz by Caitlin Gow, author of Genealogically Speaking
  8. How to Archive Family Photos: help for managing digital overload by Shelley Bishop, author of A Sense of Family
  9. Processing Civil War pension files by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
  10. How to Make Your Genealogy Travel a Reality by Lynn Palermo, author of The Armchair Genealogist
  11. FHL Sessions Available Online For Free by Ancestry Insider, author of The Ancestry Insider
  12. Genealogy Timelines: Helpful Research Tools by Gena Philibert-Ortega for GenealogyBank Blog
  13. Indexed Family History Records Now Available Through the DAR Genealogical Research System by Elizabeth O'Neal, author of Little Bytes of Life
  14. Slave Research: Four Things You Need to Know Now by Robyn, author of Reclaiming Kin
  15. Cousin Bait by Shannon Thomas, author of Our Life Picture by Picture
  16. Tech Tuesday: Finding Cousins With RootsMagic by Devon Lee, author of A Patient Genealogist
  17. If You Could Chat with An Ancestor.... by Nancy, author of My Ancestors and Me
  18. Branches Intertwining by Leslie, author of The People of Pancho
  19. Are You a Fan of Steve Morse’s One-Step Page? by Jennifer Alford, author of Jenealogy
  20. You Have To See This: MyHeritage Instant Discoveries™ in Oslo by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  21. Our Deadly Past: Epidemics in Your Family History by Amie Bowser Tennant for RootsBid Blog

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

"May I Introduce To You" Interviews on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Jana's Place

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Monday, June 1, 2015

Legacy Family Tree ~ Downloading a Source from FamilySearch

The latest update of Legacy Family Tree (8.0.0.499) includes a neat new feature. Users are now able to download sources from FamilySearch. I downloaded this update today and then tried out this awesome new feature. I think this is a great new tool and thought I'd share what I learned about it with you today.

In order to add FamilySearch sources to your Legacy database, the "Integrate with FamilySearch" option needs to be checked. To do this, simply click on the "Options" tab, then click on "Customize." Scroll down to FamilySearch and check "Integrate with FamilySearch" and click Save.


By the way, you will need to have a FamilySearch account to integrate your Legacy database with FamilySearch. It's free to sign up and you don't need to be a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) to have a FamilySearch account.



Now that your database is integrated with FamilySearch, I'll show you how to add FamilySearch sources. You can do this two different ways. One way is to click on the arrows next to your ancestor's name.


Or you can click on the "FamilySearch" tab at the top.


 Clicking the arrows or the tab will cause a new window to appear which looks like this.


Click on the "Sources" tab. As you can see from this screenshot, there are lots of FamilySearch sources that I can add to my Legacy database for my great-grandfather Christopher Iverson.


To add a FamilySearch source, click on the little black arrow to the left of the source title. A box like this will appear giving you the option to choose the source tags you want to check.


I added the first source and continued adding more sources for Christopher Iverson.


When I clicked on the round information button on the far right in the FamilySearch Sources side of the screen, this box appeared indicating which Source Tags were associated with that particular source. These source tags are also represented by the bright green dots as well.


I copied all of the FamilySearch sources over to my Legacy Database for Christopher Iverson.


Here's the family view for Christopher Iverson in my Legacy Database. To see the FamilySearch sources I just added, I just clicked on the sources icon.


And here are some of the sources I had just added.


I hope this little tutorial has been helpful for you. I think this new feature in Legacy Family Tree is pretty awesome!

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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