Thursday, May 2, 2019

The Webster Dehorning Chute by E. P. C. Webster

Back in April of 2016, I shared the exciting discovery that my maternal 2nd great-grandfather, Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster, was an inventor and that he had applied for and had been granted a patent for his invention. If you'd like to read about that, click HERE. Ebenezer, or E.P.C. as he was also known by, invented The Webster Dehorning Chute. It was a device to dehorn cattle.

Recently, while doing research in Newspapers.com, I found several ads for Ebenezer's Dehorning Chute invention. Today I'd like to share one of the ads. It's an almost full-page ad on the front page of the Kansas Farmer newspaper, dated Thursday, November 1, 1888.


Under the title "The Webster Dehorning Chute" are the words (Patent Applied For.) Ebenezer's patent was filed on May 22, 1888, and his patent was granted on April 15, 1890.

I'm quite impressed with the size of this ad, and that it is an illustration of how Ebenezer's Dehorning Chute worked.

I decided to save screenshots of each individual illustration and share them here. I also saved a screenshot of the instructions below the illustrations.








Here's the transcription of the paragraphs/instructions under the illustrations:

The foregoing illustrations show the great Dehorning Chute, invented and patent applied for by E. P. C. WEBSTER, of MARYSVILLE, KAS. Our readers know we have published everything that has come under our observation in the way of throwing light on the subject. For some time it has seemed that the question as to "whether or not it was best to dehorn," is settled in the affirmative. But the greater question, as to "How shall we hold the animals?" has been seemingly the only question asked of late on the subject. Mr. Webster has proven equal to the emergency, and has answered the question, and here we have it illustrated in four different views -

The first in the act of dehorning.

The second, with the cow released and ready to walk out.

The third, she has just gone out, and the one that stood behind her is now caught and will soon lose her horns.

The last picture shows the machine loaded on a wagon and the operator en route for another job. It is easily loaded in this position in ten minutes, and unloaded and set up in ten minutes more.

An expert can dehorn a cow per minute as long as they are kept up in the chute behind.

This frame stands in a low, strong wagon-bed. It has movable wings that are attached to the roller on top, by means of which it is drawn against the animal, and steadies it so it can't fall; the head is caught in a stanchion that opens and admits the animals walking through it; the head in the stanchion, the hood is thrown over the head and attached to the little windlass, and a man or boy draws the head to the right and holds it still; as soon as the horns are off, the attendant lets go the windlass crank, and the head is all free in an instant; then the operator, with one motion of his left hand on the two levers on top loosens the body and head both, and out goes the muley.

For large lots of cattle, this chute is set at the head of a long chute, such as is usually used for branding, and this entire length kept full of cattle. As one walks out, they all move up the length of a cow. For small lots, they may be driven into the barn or shed, and the chute set at the door, or into a small yard and the chute set at the gate.
 Write to E. P. C. WEBSTER, MARYSVILLE, KAS., or W. H. RICHARDS, CRESCO, IOWA, Proprietors and manufacturers, for Circulars, mentioning always the KANSAS FARMER.

Preserve this number for future reference.


The discovery of this newspaper ad for my 2nd great-grandfather's invention is quite fascinating and exciting.

I'll share more newspaper finds about Ebenezer in future posts.

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2019 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Fred E. Webster, Jeweler ~ Ad in an 1890's Newspaper


Watson Emory Webster was my maternal great-grandfather. He's also known as "The Traveling Dentist" here on my blog. During his life he lived in and traveled to many different places. He practiced dentistry in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil. During part of the late 1800's he lived in the state of Kansas.

At some point in his life he changed his name from Watson Emory Webster to Frederick Emory Webster. 

While doing research in the Newspapers.com website, I searched for Fred E. Webster. Among the many search results was several very interesting advertisements.

I'd like to share one of them today. It's from the Alliance Signal (Stockton, Kansas) dated 14 September 1893, Page 3.



Here's a transcription of the advertisement ~

FRED E. WEBSTER
JEWELER

20 to 60 per
cent discount on
all goods in my
line, for the
next ten days.
Located in Raynolds' Drug Store.

What a great find! But, I wondered if this Fred E. Webster was my great-grandpa Frederick E. Webster. Through further research, I found that yes, the Fred in the ad was my great-grandpa Frederick E. Webster. An article in a newspaper referred to a Fred as the son of E. P. C. Webster. My great-grandpa Fred was the son of E. P. C. Webster. So that was an encouraging piece of evidence. Another article spoke of Frederick's sister-in-law coming to visit and referred to him as Fred E. Webster. There were other articles as well that provided evidence that this Fred E. Webster is my great-grandpa Frederick E. Webster.

Speaking of Frederick's father, E. P. C. Webster, I found a lot of interesting articles about him and his life in the newspapers. It would seem that the apple didn't fall far from the tree when it came to Fred and his father, E. P. C. I just assumed that E. P. C. was a farmer living a quiet life on the land, but I was wrong. I'll share more about my discoveries regarding E. P. C. in future posts.

Now back to today's advertisement about Fred as a jeweler. Isn't it fascinating? I knew great-grandpa Frederick had been a dentist and an inventor, but I didn't know he had also been a jeweler at some point during his life. This was an intriguing discovery.

I'm so excited to have found this ad about my great-grandfather, Frederick E. Webster. I've also found other interesting ads and articles, which I will be sharing in future posts.

Using newspapers in our family history research is so rewarding. They can provide a unique glimpse into the lives of our ancestors.

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2019 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, April 12, 2019

My 7th Blogiversary...Belated


I just realized that I actually missed my blogiversary this year. Oops! It was on April 5th. How is it possible that my blog is already seven years old? It's hard to believe. But, I really am glad that I began this blog on April 5, 2012. It's been a fun and rewarding way to share my family history.

So much has happened in our family since my last blogiversary in April of 2018. It mostly centered around caring for my Mom, who was diagnosed with Dementia, most likely Alzheimer's, in November of 2017. It was heartbreaking to watch her decline throughout the year. On October 27, 2018 she passed away and is now free from pain and suffering. I like to think about how happy my Mom and Dad must be to be together again.

There were also happy times in our family during 2018: spending time with family, vacations, celebrating birthdays, etc. We also welcomed our fifth grandchild into our family in 2018. She's absolutely adorable! We love her and all of our grandchildren so much.

THANK YOU

Thank you to my wonderful readers for taking the time to read my posts and for leaving comments over the years. I appreciate your support very much!

BLOGGING YEAR IN REVIEW

Here are some posts from the last year (since my last blogiversary)

More From The Vintage Box - Vintage Photo Viewer Keychains - April 23, 2018

Saving My Dad's Canvas Painting Apron From the Estate Sale - June 23, 2018

Frederico Moyer Webster ~ A Newly-Discovered Great-Uncle - July 12, 2018

Even More Joyful Times ~ Adding Another New Daughter-in-Law's Name to My Genealogy Database - August 1, 2018

My Dad's Business Card - August 30, 2018

Another Cousin Connection Through Genealogy Blogging - October 4, 2018

The Passing of my Beautiful Mom, Elizabeth Webster Iverson - November 19, 2018

My Second Blog Book - January 12, 2019

My 2013 Blog Book - January 31, 2019

My Dad's Business Card When He Worked as an Escrow Officer - February 21, 2019

Clara M. Waterman, The Beauty of the Family - March 7, 2019

I didn't blog very much last year. Hopefully I'll be able to get back to blogging on a more regular basis in the near future.

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2019 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Clara M. Waterman, The Beauty of the Family



Clara M. Waterman was my first cousin three times removed. She was the daughter of Jason C. Waterman and Josephine Lovina Waterman. Yes, they both had the same last names. Jason and Josephine were first cousins. Their fathers, David Bassett Waterman and Asher Waterman were brothers. Asher was my third great-grandfather.

Jason and Josephine married on 1 December 1858 in Scioto County, Ohio. Jason divorced Josephine and married his second wife in 1877. There's a whole other story about the divorce and subsequent marriage of Jason to his second wife, and what happened to Josephine. But that will wait until a future post.

Clara was the only child born to Jason and Josephine Waterman. It was said that Clara was "the beauty of the family." 1

Clara was "raised by L. C. Crary of Middleport, Ohio." 2 I assume this was the case because of the circumstances surrounding Jason's divorce and what happened to Josephine. I found Clara living with the Ludowic Crary family in the 1880 census for Middleport, Meigs, Ohio. 3 Lodowic was Clara's first cousin. He was the son of Jason's sister, Eunice Waterman.

Clara M. Waterman was born on 4 September 1862 in Ohio. 4  She married Thomas Henry Gates on 7 May 1885 in Meigs County, Ohio. 5

Clara and Thomas were the parents of six children:

  1. Charles Frank Gates (1887-1956)
  2. Mary (Mae) Eunice Gates (1889-1959)
  3. Helen Josephine Gates (1891- ?)
  4. Edith Margaret Gates (1894 - 1976)
  5. Frank Jason Gates (1897 - 1985)
  6. Child Gates (? - Before 1900)

Clara's husband, Thomas, was from Pennsylvania. Sometime after their wedding they settled in Pennsylvania. All of their known children were born in Pennsylvania and the 1900-1930 U.S. federal census records show their family living in Bridgewater, Beaver, Pennsylvania. I have yet to identify their sixth child and where he or she was born.

Clara passed away on 16 December 1937 in Bridgewater, Beaver, Pennsylvania. 6 She was 75 years of age at the time of her death.

Clara was born during the American Civil War and lived to see many things during her lifetime including inventions such as the automobile, telephone, radio, talking motion pictures, and even Kellogg's Cornflakes. She was 54 years old when America entered WWI and was 56 years of age when the 19th Amendment to the Constitution was ratified, giving women the right to vote.

I wish I could see a photo of Clara. As "the beauty of the family" I wonder what she looked like.

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2019 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved



1 Jacobus, Donald Lines, and Edgar Francis Waterman. The Waterman Family. Vol. 2. Page 595. Salem, MA: Higginson Book, 1942.
2 Jacobus, Donald Lines, and Edgar Francis Waterman. The Waterman Family. Vol. 2. Page 595. Salem, MA: Higginson Book, 1942.
3 1880 U.S. census, Meigs, Ohio, population schedule, Middleport, Page 11; Enumeration District: 0116; Page 232C (stamped), FHL microfilm: 1241374; dwelling 100, family 115, Clara Waterman; image, Ancestry.com. (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 March 2019); citing Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. NARA microfilm publication T9, 1454 rolls.
4 Ancestry.com. Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1944 Clara M. Waterman Gates. File No. 114381; [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014. Image 1943 of 3780. Pennsylvania (State). Death certificates, 1906–1963. Series 11.90 (1,905 cartons). Records of the Pennsylvania Department of Health, Record Group 11. Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/
5 "Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013," Clara M. Waterman and Thomas Henry Gates; database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-91NR-J?cc=1614804&wc=Q6SP-WSX%3A121348301%2C121637101 : 15 July 2014), Meigs > Marriage records 1879-1885 vol 7 > image 337 of 349; county courthouses, Ohio. Accessed 8 March 2019.
6 Ancestry.com. Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1944 Clara M. Waterman Gates. File No. 114381; [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014. Image 1943 of 3780. Pennsylvania (State). Death certificates, 1906–1963. Series 11.90 (1,905 cartons). Records of the Pennsylvania Department of Health, Record Group 11. Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/

Thursday, February 21, 2019

My Dad's Business Card When He Worked as an Escrow Officer

In a previous post I shared one of my Dad's business cards. It wasn't his business card as an employee for a large corporation, but for his own personal business called EZuse Software.

Today I'm sharing another business card that belonged to my Dad. This is a card he had as an employee in a company called City Title Insurance Company. It was located at 601 Hamilton Street in Redwood City, California.

From the business card it looks like my Dad worked as an Escrow Officer at the company.



Our family lived in Redwood City for several years when I was a young child. I was curious about the company my Dad worked for so I did a Google search for City Title Insurance Company, but nothing with that name came up in the results. And whatever building this company occupied back when my Dad worked there doesn't show up on Google Maps.

As you can see in the Google Maps screen capture below, the pin for the address is in a parking lot. And the addresses on the buildings on either side of the parking lot are 500 on one side and 627 on the other side. So it appears 601 Hamilton Street is no longer there.


I'm intrigued by the City Title Insurance Company's telephone number on my Dad's business card. Emerson 9-4121 sounds like a Telephone Exchange Names phone number that was used previous to today's all-number calling system.

I'm so glad we still have this old business card from when my Dad worked as an Escrow Officer. He later became a computer programmer and worked for a large corporation in San Francisco.

Thanks for stopping by!

Jana

© 2019 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved

Printfriendly

ShareThis

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...