Wednesday, August 5, 2020

Lesson Learned. Always Check for Additional Pages

I've been working on a timeline in Excel about my maternal great-grandfather, Watson (Frederick) Emory Webster, a.k.a. "The Traveling Dentist" here on my blog.

While doing some research for this timeline, I took another look at a document I shared in a previous post back in 2013. It's a U.S. Consular Registration Application from 1917 for Frederick.1 I was looking at it on Ancestry and clicked on the little arrow on the right side and there was a second page to this application! Not only that, it turns out that there was a third and fourth page too! I had only downloaded the first page to my computer years ago. Now these additional pages have been downloaded to my computer as well.

This second page contains some interesting information.


Information gleaned from this second page:

Name of witness: J. C. Terry
Address of witness: Curitiba, Parana
Date: 29 August 1917
Identifying documents: Previous registration
Name of person to notify in the event of death or disability: Rollin W. Webster
Address of person to notify in the event of death or disability: Chicago, Illinois
Additional data: I own land at Ironton, Missouri
Addresses supplied by Frederick for investigation:

Dr. F. S. Webster
Clinton, Missouri

Rollin W. Webster
525 E. 37th Street
Chicago, Illinois

Rollin W. Webster and Dr. F. S. Webster were Frederick's brothers. F. S. stands for Frank Summers. He was also a dentist. A very interesting bit of information on this page is that Frederick stated he owned land in Ironton, Missouri. Wow! I wonder if I can find some land records about his property.

Here's the third page of Frederick's application.


This is an affidavit in which the applicant had to explain the reason for their "protracted foreign residence" etc.

Information gleaned from this third page:

Date Frederick ceased to reside in the United States: On or about 20 October 1911
Places Frederick lived temporarily since that date: Various places in Brazil
When Frederick arrived in Curitiba, Brazil: About 1915
Reasons for such residence: Frederick said, "I have built up a profitable practice in dentistry which I cannot abandon to return to the United States to start in anew at this time and I expect to return at such time as I retire from practice."
Since establishing a residence abroad Frederick made how many visits to the USA: None
Frederick stated he never was naturalized, took an oath of allegiance, or voted as a foreign citizen or subject.
Frederick maintained the following ties to family, business, and property with the United States: "8 tracts of land near Ironton, Mirrouri on which I pay taxes. Also have two brothers and a sister living in the United States."
Did Frederick pay the American Income Tax?: Frederick said he did not and said, "My income is below legal minimum."
When did Frederick intend to return to the United States permanently?: Frederick answered within four years or when "I retire from practice."
Frederick last registered at the American Consular Office: At Santos, Brazil in about 1915.

There's so much information on this page. It's great to know the reason Frederick stayed abroad. It looks like he was doing pretty well with his dental practice. On the second page of this application he mentioned he owned land at Ironton, Missouri. On this third page he gave more specific information about that land. He said he owned eight tracts of land near Ironton. He also said he paid taxes on that land. These bits of information could lead to further research in land records and tax records, right? 

Frederick also mentioned he had two brothers and a sister living in the United States. His two brothers were those mentioned on the second page. Frederick had three sisters, but only one living at the time of this application. The surviving sister was Lura Elizabeth Webster. The two sisters who had already passed away were Mary Alice Webster and Lillian Dell Webster.

Frederick said he intended to return to the United States permanently within four years or when he retired. I don't know that that ever happened. He moved and traveled so much. I'd have to do more research to find out if he established a permanent residence in the USA at some point after this application. Frederick ultimately passed away in Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil on 21 July 1946 and is buried in the Araca Cemetery in Sao Paulo.

Frederick stated that he had registered at the American Consular Office at Santos, Brazil around 1915, which is true. He also registered at the American Consular Office in Mexico City, Mexico in 1923.

The fourth page of Frederick's application is titled "Opinion of Officer Taking Affidavit" and contains a paragraph written by the officer. I won't include that here in this blog post.

The information within this U.S. Consular Registration Application is fascinating. I'm so glad I clicked those little arrows to see if there were additional pages in Frederick's application!

Now I need to go back to the other U.S. Consular Registration Applications for Frederick to see if I missed any additional pages in those.

Lesson learned. Always check for additional pages.

Thanks for reading!

Jana

© 2020 Copyright by Jana Iverson Last, All Rights Reserved



1 “U.S., Consular Registration Applications, 1916-1925,” database, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 4 July 2020), Frederick Emory Webster.

6 comments:

  1. Great advice - I have learned the "click the arrow" trick as well! Glad you found so much additional information :)

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  2. I remember when I first learned that there were second pages to ship manifests with lots of important information. I had to go back to all the ones I'd already found and look for those second pages. Good tip!

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  3. I learned that recently as well. I was looking at my great-grandfathers Iowa State census and noticed it listed his parents on the indexed page on ancestry. I was confused because I did not see his parents listed on page one. There were three pages to the Iowa State Census that listed parents names and where they where born and where they married. So much great information I almost missed. Lesson Learned.

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    Replies
    1. Oh wow! That's amazing! That Iowa State Census sounds awesome! This is a great lesson too. Thank you for sharing!

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