Monday, April 22, 2013

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Eunice (Waterman) Crary and James Lewis Crary

Eunice Waterman Crary and James L. Crary Tombstone
Eunice Waterman Crary and James L. Crary Tombstone
Photographer - Willi Anderson
Used With Permission

I recently discovered the tombstone for my 2nd great-grandaunt, Eunice (Waterman) Crary and her husband James Lewis Crary.  It's located at the Middleport Hill Cemetery in Meigs County, Ohio.

Here's a closer look at this tombstone.


Eunice Waterman Crary and James L. Crary Tombstone Close-up
Eunice Waterman Crary and James L. Crary Tombstone
Photographer - Willi Anderson
Used With Permission

I know this is difficult to read, so here is the transcription:

James L. Crary
1806 – 1869
Eunice W. Crary
1822 – 1899

The website where I found this tombstone was a new discovery for me.  I want to share this resource for anyone who may have ancestors who were buried in Ohio.  The website is OHIO Gravestones.org.

I contacted the photographer, Willi Anderson, who took these tombstone photos and was given permission to use them as I wish.  Willi even attached copies of the original photos in the email response to me.  I , of course, thanked Willi in my return email, but I will take this opportunity to thank Willi publicly as well.  Thank you Willi for taking the time to photograph these tombstones and for allowing me to use them in my blog.

Now, here's a little bit about Eunice (Waterman) Crary and her husband James Lewis Crary.

Eunice was the fourth of twelve children born to
Asher Waterman and Bathsheba (Paulk) Waterman, my maternal 3rd great-grandparents.  Eunice was born in 1822 in Troy, Athens, Ohio and passed away in 1899.

James Lewis Crary was the son of Frederick Crary and Lydia (Updyke) Crary.  He was born in 1806 in Rhode Island and passed away in 1869.

Eunice and James were married on October 27, 1840 in Athens County, Ohio.  They were the parents of five children:

  1. Lodowic Updike Crary (1842-1926)
  2. Dr. Archibald Crary (1845-Before 1910)
  3. Melissa Crary
  4. Mary Crary (1851-1927)
  5. Cynthia Crary (1859-?)
I'm so glad I found the Ohio Gravestones website and hope you will find it useful in your family history research.

Thanks for reading!


© 2013 Copyright by Jana Last

6 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing this, Jana. I had not heard of Ohiogravestones.org yet and I have several of my lines that are in Ohio. I can already see that not only will the site be useful, but I'll likely be able to contribute quite a bit to it as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Christopher,

      You're so welcome! And it's great that you will be able to contribute to this cool website too. Thanks in advance for doing that!

      Thank you for stopping by and for your comments!

      Delete
  2. Excellent that you were able to find this gravestone on the new site, and I am amazed that you were able to read it. Now that you've transcribed it, I can kind of see it. I really admire the efforts that are being made nationwide to preserve, photograph, and digitize tombstone photos. They are there to be remembered, so I'm glad people are getting about the business of remembering them. If it weren't for genealogists . . .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Mariann,

      Well, I can't take credit for transcribing the gravestone actually. It was transcribed on the website, although it had the wrong birth and death dates for James. That gravestone really is difficult to read.

      I join you in being thankful for those who take the time to preserve these tombstones through transcription, photographs, etc. What a great service they are providing to everyone.

      Thanks so much for stopping by!

      Delete
  3. Even though James was quite a bit older than Eunice, it's amazing and sad both that she lived as a widow for 30 years. That's longer than many people are even married!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Wendy,

      Thank you for pointing out the age difference and how long Eunice was a widow. I had overlooked those facts, silly me! 30 years is a terribly long time to be a widow. Poor Eunice! She was found living with one of her sons in the 1880 census. I wonder if she was living with him or one of her other children until she passed away.

      Thanks so much for stopping by!

      Delete

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