Monday, August 25, 2014

52 Ancestors: #34 ~ Lillian Dell Webster – Daughter of a Civil War Veteran

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.


Lura Elizabeth Webster and Lillian Dell Webster
Lura Elizabeth Webster
and
Lillian Dell Webster

This is a picture of Lillian Dell Webster and her sister Lura Elizabeth Webster. Lura is sitting and Lillian is standing. The picture was taken at Lura's home in Alhambra, Los Angeles, California. I wrote about Lura in a previous 52 Ancestors post. If you'd like to read that post, click HERE.

Today I'd like to introduce you to Lillian Dell Webster. She was my maternal great-grandaunt. Lillian was the fifth of six children born to Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster and Cynthia Maria Waterman. Ebenezer was a Civil War veteran.

Lillian was a younger sibling of my great-grandfather, Watson (Frederick) Emory Webster, a.k.a. "The Traveling Dentist" here on my blog.

On 16 September 1885 Lillian married James Perry Burket in Oketo, Kansas. They were the parents of five children.

  1. Frank Charles Burket (1886-1950)
  2. Lura Edith Burket (1888-1975)
  3. Mary Alice Burket (1889-1958)
  4. Maud Inez Burket (1891-?)
  5. Carol Anderson Burket (1895-1978)
It appears that Lillian named some of her children after family members, which is awesome. She must have named her oldest daughter after her sister Lura.

And Lillian had a brother named Frank Summers Webster. Lura's husband had a brother named Benjamin Franklin Burket. Perhaps Lura and James' oldest son, Frank Charles, was named after both of their brothers.

Also, Lura had an older sister named Mary Alice Webster, who died when she was only two and a half years old. Perhaps Lura named her third child after her sister, Mary Alice.

Lillian Dell Webster Burket passed away on 28 August 1914 at 46 years of age. She was buried at the Marysville Cemetery in Marysville, Marshall, Kansas.


Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, August 15, 2014

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for August 15, 2014


NOTE: Due to the upcoming wedding of our son, and the family and wedding activities this coming week, there will not be a Fab Finds post next Friday, August 22. Fab Finds will resume on Friday, August 29.

My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. 5 MORE WAYS TO BUILD A BETTER BLOG by Jenny Lanctot, author of Are My Roots Showing?
  2. Gretna Green and Marriage Records AND Finding Missing Marriage Records by Nancy Loe, author of Sassy Jane Genealogy
  3. Discovering Civil War Questionnaires & Reunions by Dana, author of The Enthusiastic Genealogist
  4. Ancestor Maps by Roberta Estes, author of DNA eXplained – Genetic Genealogy
  5. Do's and Don'ts for FGS 2014 by Amy Coffin, author of The We Tree Genealogy Blog
  6. Review: County-Clerks.com by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  7. Have you got a word for me? by Jill Ball, author of GeniAus
  8. The New Indexing Program: Even More Features to Look forward To by Janell Vasquez for FamilySearch Blog
  9. The 1797 New Madrid MO Census – with family specific notes by Beth Foulk, author of Genealogy Decoded
  10. No more stripping in the living room for me! by Janelle Collins, author of Janelle's family tree addiction
  11. I'm a ProGen Alumnus! by Miriam J. Robbins, author of AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestors
  12. I've Got News! by Michelle Ganus Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
  13. A free research log to help us organize and solve problems AND Popular Canadian genealogy website discontinued by Gail Dever, author of Genealogy a la carte
  14. World War I Prisoners of War Documents by Bernfeldfamily, author of Bernfeld Family of Galicia & More
  15. I Am Back! by Yvette Porter Moore, author of ROOT DIGGER GENEALOGY
  16. Learning to Like the Referee by Michael Judson for FamilySearch Blog
  17. Looking for United Empire Loyalist Ancestors by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  18. Step away from the desk by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
  19. Potential breaks in the brick wall by Patrick Jones, author of Frequent Traveler Ancestry

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

An exciting announcement by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Jana's Place

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, August 14, 2014

52 Ancestors: #33 ~ My Grandmother – Sarah Vasques Madeira

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.


Sarah Vasques Madeira
Sarah Vasques Madeira
Circa 1923
We have a lot of exciting stuff going on around here right now. Our second-oldest son is getting married this Saturday, so as you can imagine, we are pretty busy with wedding activities.

So, this week's 52 Ancestors post will be brief. I thought I would share a photo of my maternal grandmother, Sarah Vasques Madeira, that I haven't shared here on my blog before. I've written about my Grandma Sarah several times on my blog. Here's a list of the blog posts I've written about her in case you'd like to read them.

Wordless Wednesday–Sarah Vasques Madeira

Sepia Saturday 130–Two Love Birds

Amanuensis Monday–A Brazilian Death Record: Sarah Vasques Madeira Webster

Sepia Saturday 134–Sarah Webster Holding Her Sweet Little Baby

Sepia Saturday 142–Three Hats ~ Three People

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

I'm Part of the New MIITY Team

Teamwork - Microsoft Office Free Image
I'm excited and honored to be part of the new "May I Introduce To You" (MIITY) team at GeneaBloggers.

"May I Introduce To You" is a weekly feature in which members of the GeneaBloggers community are interviewed. Their interviews are published on Mondays on the GeneaBloggers website.

Thomas MacEntee, founder of GeneaBloggers, announced the new team on the GeneaBloggers website yesterday. Please take a few moments to read the announcement and meet the new team by clicking on the following link.

Come Meet the New “May I Introduce To You” Team at GeneaBloggers

I look forward to working with Thomas and my fellow "May I Introduce To You" team members.

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Monday, August 11, 2014

52 Ancestors: #32 ~ Oscar Iverson

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.

Oscar Iverson
Oscar Iverson
This is a photo of Oscar Iverson, my paternal great-granduncle and brother of my great-grandfather, Christopher Iverson. I introduced you to Christopher and his brother Edward in previous 52 Ancestors posts.

Oscar was the sixth child born to Iver Iverson and Marit Thorsdatter. In my previous post about Christopher, I mentioned that Oscar became a carpenter like Christopher. Also like Christopher, Oscar was listed as a house carpenter in census records. Both the 1920 and 1930 federal censuses listed Oscar's occupation as a house carpenter. In the 1940 census, Oscar was listed as carpenter in the building construction industry.

Oscar was born on 16 November 1871 in Birch Cooley Township, Olivia, Renville, Minnesota. He was married and divorced twice. He first married Serena Mary Christopherson, daughter of Ole Anthon Christopherson and Aslaug Nilsdatter. Serena was the sister of Anna Christopherson, who was married to Oscar's brother Christopher.

Oscar and Serena were married on 10 October 1894 in Benson, Swift, Minnesota. They were the parents of four children.
  1. Pearl Olga Marie Iverson (1897-?)
  2. Ernst Oliver Iverson (Abt 1899-1899)
  3. Bert Oliver Iverson (1900-1951)
  4. Dollie Selma Iverson (1905-1990)
Oscar and Serena divorced sometime before 2 August 1909 because that's the date that Oscar married his second wife, Ella Lind, daughter of Edward Lind and Katharine Kane.

Oscar and Ella were married in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. They didn't have any children together. I'm not sure when they divorced. In the 1930 census, Oscar was living alone. Ella was not listed in the household. He was listed as married. Perhaps they were separated at that time. In the 1940 census, Oscar was listed as divorced.

Oscar passed away on 8 December 1858 in Kirkland, King, Washington at 87 years of age. He was buried in Hillgrove Cemetery, which is located in Des Moines, King, Washington.

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Sources:

"United States Census, 1920," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/MHNM-YFY : accessed 06 Aug 2014), Oscar Iverson, Clark, Lewis, Washington, United States; citing sheet 9B, family 223, NARA microfilm publication T625, FHL microfilm 1821933.

"United States Census, 1930," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XC3K-LQ4 : accessed 06 Aug 2014), Oscar Iverson, Centralia, Lewis, Washington, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 0019, sheet 6A, family 131, NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 2507.

"United States Census, 1940," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/K9S9-H7S : accessed 06 Aug 2014), Oscar Ivarson, Ward 12, Centralia, Centralia Election Precinct, Lewis, Washington, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 21-20, sheet 4A, family 6, NARA digital publication of T627, roll 4350.

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