Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Leaving Norway ~ Ole Iversen


Last week I shared the Migration Record of my paternal 2nd great-grandfather, Iver Iverson. In that post, I mentioned that I also have the Migration Record for Iver's brother Ole. Today I'd like to share that record with you. It just so happens that it is the exact same record as Iver's. That's because Iver and Ole were listed on the same page in the Migration Record for 1858, which is part of a Parish Register for Nes, Buskerud, Norway.1

Iver is listed inside the blue rectangle on this page and Ole and his family are inside the red rectangle near the bottom of the page.



Before we look at the information about Ole and his family in this document, I'd like to tell you a little bit about them.

Ole Iversen was born on 1 November 1822 and was christened on 8 December 1822 in Nes, Hallingdal, Buskerud, Norway. He was the son of Iver Stenersen and Guri Olsdatter.2

When Ole was 33 years old, he married Anne Gunbjornsdatter. Their marriage took place on 29 September 1856 in Nes, Hallingdal, Buskerud, Norway.3

Their daughter, Guri, was born on 28 May 1857 and was christened on 14 June 1857 in Nes, Hallingdal, Buskerud, Norway.4

Guri was only about a year old when Ole and his young family immigrated to the United States.  What must it have been like for them to make this long voyage across the Atlantic Ocean in 1858?  I can only imagine how difficult it must have been for them.

Let's look at the information in the Migration Record. I don't speak or read Norwegian, so reading some of the words in this document was a bit difficult.

Here's a cropped view showing Ole and his family in the Migration Record.


I couldn't figure out what some of the words were in these columns, so I asked for help in two of the Norwegian Genealogy groups that I belong to on Facebook. I uploaded these images and posted my query. Within half an hour two kind and helpful people from one of the groups translated the words in the document for me. I was told that the word in front of Ole's name is an abbreviated form of "husmann" which means tenant farmer. And I was told that the word in front of Anne's name is "hustru" which means wife, and that the word in front of Guri's name is "barn" which means child.

Information for Ole

Number: 52
Date: April
Name: Ole Iversen Mar. (Mar. is short for Marteplads, Ole's place of birth)
Age: 36
Destination: Amerika

Information for Anne

Number: 53
Date: April
Name: Anne Gunbjornsdr Opdal (Opdal is Anne's place of birth)
Age: 1827 (year of birth instead of age)
Destination: Amerika

Information for Guri

Number: 54
Date: April
Name: Guri
Age: 1
Destination: Amerika

Ole and Anne had two more children after they arrived in the United States. Here's the complete list of their children.
  1. Guri Olesdatter (1857-1922) [born in Norway]
  2. Isabelle Marie Iversen (1863-1954) [born in Minnesota]
  3. Iver O. Iversen (1864-1928) [born in Iowa]
Ole's parents, Iver and Guri, and his brother Christopher, immigrated to the United States in 1861. I will be sharing their Migration Record in a future post.

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved



1 The National Archives of Norway, Digital Archives, Buskerud county, Nes, Parish register (official) nr. 9 (1834-1863), Migration records 1858, Ole Iversen, page 593. Line 52.
2 "Norway, Baptisms, 1634-1927," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NWXS-2QP : accessed 10 March 2015), Ole Iversen, 01 Nov 1822; citing ; FHL microfilm 123,840.
3 ] "Norway, Marriages, 1660-1926," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NW71-BJT : accessed 10 March 2015), Ole Iversen and Anne Gunbjornsdr, 29 Sep 1856; citing Nes I Hallingdal, Buskerud, Norway; FHL microfilm 278,204.
4 "Norway, Baptisms, 1634-1927," index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NWHZ-ZMR : accessed 10 March 2015), Guri Olesdatter, 28 May 1857; citing ; FHL microfilm 123,841.

4 comments:

  1. I admire the courage it took to make such a voyage.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do too Wendy. It must have been such a difficult voyage at that time.

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