Friday, October 30, 2015

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for October 30, 2015


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. rootstech 2016: so many chances to win by Tami Osmer Mize, author of Relatively Curious
  2. Would You Like to Contribute to the Honor Roll Project for Veteran's Day, 2015? by Heather Wilkinson Rojo, author of Nutfield Genealogy
  3. International Tracing Service Came Through! Paul Diamond's Displaced Persons Records by Lara Diamond, author of Lara's Family Search
  4. Soldiers of the Queen by Dianne Nolin, author of Genealogy: Beyond the BMD
  5. Do you have any genealogy documents hiding in your home? by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
  6. The Care and Preservation of Family Bibles by Melissa Barker, author of A Genealogist In The Archives
  7. Genealogy Weekly: Ancestry Mexico, North Carolina Newspapers and More by Amy Johnson Crow, author of Amy Johnson Crow Blog
  8. Ancestry Mexico Launches with More than 220 Million Searchable Mexican Historical Records by Ancestry Team for Ancestry.com Blog
  9. AncestryDNA Kit Giveaway! by Sarah O'Connor, author of Geneartistry
  10. Join Us in November for Family History Writing Month! AND Contest: Win a Flip-Pal® Mobile Scanner by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  11. Fiction, Nonfiction or Memoir…What Will You Write in November? by Lisa A. Alzo, author of The Accidental Genealogist
  12. Two Sisters, Two Stories by Michelle Ganus Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
  13. Understanding Spanish Naming Conventions by Julie Cordero, author of Oak Grove Genealogy
  14. 6 Tips for Telling a Better Genealogy Story by Joanne Cowden, author of Researching Relatives
  15. Not driving horses by Debi Austen, author of Who Knew?
  16. How Did I Miss This Before? Ancestry.com Shows Others Researching a Person by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  17. Next Generation from Legacy Family Tree Webinars by Cheri Hudson Passey, author of Carolina Girl Genealogy
  18. What Kind of Genealogist Are You? by Lorine McGinnis Schulze for Legacy News Blog
  19. Do You Have a Skeleton in your Family History Closet? by Diana Elder for Family Locket

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

This week's "May I Introduce To You" Interview on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Blogosphere Last Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Jana's Place

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, October 29, 2015

RootsTech 2016 Opening Day Keynote Speakers Announced


The following is from RootsTech

SALT LAKE CITY, October 27, 2015—RootsTech, the largest family history conference in the world, announced today the first three keynote speakers in its all-star lineup for RootsTech 2016. The first general session (Thursday, February 4, 2016) will feature three inspiring speakers, which include New York Times bestselling author Bruce Feiler, award-winning journalist Paula Williams Madison, and the president and CEO of FamilySearch International, Stephen Rockwood.

Bruce Feiler is a bestselling author and columnist for The New York Times, where he writes the “This Life” column about today’s families. He is also the writer and presenter of the PBS Series Walking the Bible and Sacred Journeys with Bruce Feiler.

His latest book, The Secrets of Happy Families, reviews best practices for modern-day parents from some of the country’s most creative minds, including top designers in Silicon Valley, elite peace negotiators, and the Green Berets.

 “RootsTech is the premier event for people who care about family history,” Feiler said. “I've become a passionate believer in the importance of telling your family history as a foundational tool for having a happy family. I can't think of a better audience to share my own story with.”

Paula Williams Madison is an award-winning journalist who is a former NBC executive. Currently, Madison serves as chairman and CEO of Madison Media Management LLC, a media consultancy company based in Los Angeles with global reach. She’s been named one of the “75 Most Powerful African Americans in Corporate America” by Black Enterprise Magazine and was recently honored by the East West Players and AARP with their Visionary Award.

After a successful career in news journalism, Madison retired in 2011 and embarked on a search for her grandfather Samuel Lowe, who returned to his native China after living in Jamaica. Madison produced a documentary film on the topic, Finding Samuel Lowe: From Harlem to China. In April of this year, HarperCollins published a memoir of the journey Finding Samuel Lowe: China, Jamaica, Harlem.

Attendees can expect to hear about Madison’s compelling journey, including the resources that helped her. “I used FamilySearch.org to research and try to locate my family in China. This system will help people like me find their families,” said Madison. “Family to me means bloodline—past, present, and future. You have to honor the past as you live in the present so that you can guarantee a future for your family.”

Stephen Rockwood is the new president and CEO of FamilySearch International and managing director for the Family History Department of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Prior to joining FamilySearch, Rockwood was a successful entrepreneur, creating unique service offerings for worldwide customers and building several businesses from the ground up. 

 “We look forward to another great RootsTech conference as we invite attendees to discover their families in a world-class setting. We are thrilled to welcome Bruce Feiler and Paula Williams Madison,” Rockwood said. “Their personal experiences will be highly inspiring for many as we kick off this exciting conference.

Visit RootsTech.org to reserve your seat now to hear Bruce Feiler, Paula Williams Madison, and Stephen Rockwood at the Thursday morning general session on February 4, 2016. Passes start at just $29.

RootsTech 2016 will be held on February 3–6 in Salt Lake City, Utah.


###

About RootsTech

RootsTech, hosted by FamilySearch International, is a global conference celebrating families across generations, where people of all ages are inspired to discover and share their memories and connections. This annual event has become the largest of its kind in the world, attracting tens of thousands of participants worldwide.

And the Winner of the RootsTech 2016 3-Day Pass is...


The time to enter my RootsTech 2016 3-Day Pass giveaway has ended and it's time to announce the winner.

But, before I announce the winner, I'd like to thank everyone who entered my giveaway, which included entrants from the United States, France, and New Zealand.

PromoSimple, the website I used for my giveaway, randomly selected the winner.

Okay, the time has come to announce the winner. Drum roll please...the winner of the RootsTech 2016 3-Day Pass is Mariah Hudson!

I've already contacted Mariah to tell her the great news. She sounded so excited in her reply email. And I've also sent her the RootsTech 2016 Winner Certificate.

Again, thank you to all who entered my RootsTech 2016 3-Day Pass giveaway. And congratulations Mariah!

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Petition to Sell Land

In a previous post I shared a probate record concerning William Wesley Rardin. It was a Petition to Sell Real Estate and was dated 24 December 1858.

Today I have another probate record to share with you that also concerns William Wesley Rardin. This document is a Petition to Sell Land and is dated 4 February 1859.1


Transcript of Petition to Sell Land

Probate Court Athens County Feby 4 1859
In the Matter of D. B. Webster        }
Guardian of Wm Welsey Rardin      }   Petition to Sell Land
                     vs                                      }
Wm Wesley Rardin                            }
D. B. Webster Guardian as aforesaid having made a Return of the sale of the premises in said petition described and the said Return & proceedings in the sale having been by the Court examined and the Court being satisfied that the sale has in all respects been made according to Law. It is ordered that the same be approved and confirmed: and that said Guardian execute and deliver to said purchaser a Deed in fee Simple for said Real Estate so sold as aforesaid; on the purchaser complying with the terms of said sale.
Calvary Morris Prob Judge

From this document, it appears that William's land had indeed been sold. Unfortunately, the document doesn't mention the name of the person who bought William's land.

I have another probate record regarding William Wesley Rardin that I will be sharing in a future post.

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved



1 "Ohio, Probate Records, 1789-1996," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-27661-22724-46?cc=1992421 : accessed 1 October 2015), Athens > Probate journals 1852-1871 vol 1-2 > image 229 of 597; county courthouses, Ohio.

Friday, October 23, 2015

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for October 23, 2015


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Twitter for Genealogists by Jen Baldwin for NextGen Genealogy Network
  2. Tuesday’s Genealogy Tip – Be a Reporter! by Lisa Lisson, author of Lisa Lisson
  3. Using RootsTech Site Tools to Create a Possible Schedule AND Keep the Fire Burning by Devon Lee, author of A Patient Genealogist
  4. How to Upload Your Tree to RootsWeb’s WorldConnect by Cathy Meder-Dempsey, author of Opening Doors in Brick Walls
  5. What Do I Do Next? 5 Tips for Using FamilySearch Partners by Diana Elder for Family Locket
  6. Sonia Diamond Holocaust Reparations Application by Lara Diamond, author of Lara's Family Search
  7. Deleting Person Entries in Family Tree by Matt Wright for FamilySearch Blog
  8. Look for New York Ancestors in Ledger Books Online by Lorine McGinnis Schulze, author of Ancestors At Rest
  9. Make Your Family History Survive the Test of Time by Denise May Levenick for Ancestry.com Blog
  10. HAVE EARLY MASSACHUSETTS ANCESTORS? This might be your lucky day by Diane Gould Hall, author of MICHIGAN FAMILY TRAILS
  11. Cite Your Sources on FamilySearch with the Evernote Web Clipper: Evernote for Genealogy by Lisa Louise Cooke, author of Lisa Louise Cooke's Genealogy Gems
  12. More Sessional Paper Discoveries by Dianne Nolin, author of Genealogy: Beyond the BMD
  13. Time to Write: #1 Making an Outline by Colleen G. Brown Pasquale, author of Leaves & Branches
  14. "Was" or "Is" . . . What Tense Makes Most Sense For One's Ancestors? (October 22, 2015) by John D. Tew, author of Filiopietism Prism
  15. Win a FREE RootsTech 2016 (February 3-6, 2016) Registration Here on Genea-Musings AND Forward to the Family History Future – 2045 by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  16. Immigrant Ancestors and Sport in the Progressive Era; plus Google doesn’t always know everything by Laura, author of Almost Home
  17. 4 Ways to Record Your Life for Future Researchers on Evernote by Kerry Scott for Genealogy Insider Blog
  18. Reminiscing About Blogging by Fran Ellsworth for Worldwide Genealogy ~ A Genealogical Collaboration
  19. What Orderly Roots guides should I write next? by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

This week's "May I Introduce To You" Interview on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Blogosphere Last Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, October 22, 2015

Mormon Family History Library Still Connecting Generations of Families after 30 Years

The following is from FamilySearch


(SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, 22 October 2015)—FamilySearch’s Family History Library (FHL) in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah, will celebrate its 30th anniversary on October 23, 2015. When the new facility was completed in 1985, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was already considered the foremost authority on family history research. During the past three decades, the library has been hailed by genealogists as the top research and collections library in the world—a designation it still maintains—in part, because it has evolved to keep pace with the changing demographics and demands of family researchers and the communities it serves. 

“The Family History Library in Salt Lake City is unique in all the world,” said Diane Loosle, director of the world-renowned library. She explained the focus of the library has always been to increase access to the world’s genealogical records and help patrons make personal family discoveries.
  
“To the family historian, this library is like Disneyland,” says Loosle, “There’s no place like it. People dream for years of coming. It is the largest facility of its kind and the largest of FamilySearch’s 4883 family history centers globally. Many people begin their journey of discovery at one of our facilities.” 

The Family History Library has been attracting guests and visitors from all corners of the world for three decades due to its expansive collection of resources and knowledgeable staff. “Most mornings before the library opens, people begin to queue up in front of the doors waiting to get in,” Loosle said.  

It appears the masterminds behind its construction had a vision of future demands. Plans that seemed almost grandiose when construction of the edifice was announced in 1983 have not only materialized, but have also led the way through the years to accommodate ever-improving research and information gathering options. It has come a long way since its humble beginnings in 1894 as a one- room repository of the Genealogical Society of Utah, just around the corner and up the street in a small building called the Church Historian’s Office at 58 E. South Temple. 

The five-story building in downtown Salt Lake City today continues to serve as a repository and physical point of access for FamilySearch’s now billions of records. Instead of growing numbers of microfilm and microfiche, the influx of new records today continues digitally through online indexing, patron submissions, partner exchanges, donations from various government, religious and private entities and local records preservation and access initiatives world-wide—most of which is available at FamilySearch.org.

The library continues to move with digital innovationsbenefiting from the latest technology to preserve and provide access to the world’s genealogical records and increase the success of personal discovery. Progress in gathering, copying, and making records available has been dramatic and fast. Over 300 camera teams are digitally preserving historic records worldwide—over 100 million images per year—that are published directly online.  

In this age of 24/7 access to information and growing thirst for digital services, libraries across the nation are evolving to meet the changing demands of the communities and patrons they serve, and the Family History Library is no exception.  

About 25 percent of the 2.4 million rolls of microfilm stored at the Granite Mountain Vault have been digitally published online. The Family History Library itself has about 1.5 million rolls on site. As physical films are digitized, they are removed from the library. Insofar as possible, the records teams plan on digitally publishing all of the microfilm online for 24/7 access. 

In 1985 family history research was a very individual experience requiring each person interested in a specific record to scroll through microfilm or search microfiche. In 1985 over 600 microfilm and fiche readers were housed in the Library. Though microfilms and fiche still play an important, though less frequently used role, a large portion of today’s research is now computer-based. Today the Family History Library boasts 550 Internet-enabled patron computers while still providing access to over 200 film and fiche readers. The Library also offers free access to film, book, and photo scanning equipment to help patrons digitally preserve and share family records.


The library is the hub of a worldwide genealogical library system—including 4,883 satellite branches in more than 100 countries—called FamilySearch Family History Centers or affiliate libraries. The library began serving about 2,000 patrons a day or 700,000 a year in 1985, and today, with FamilySearch.org and its satellite branches, it serves over 45 million guests per year
  
“We know that many people will never have the opportunity to visit the Family History Library in person,” said Loosle. So FamilySearch has been expanding its reach. We want everyone who desires to discover their ancestors to be able to do so, no matter where they live. 


Managing the Library Requires a Village 

Visitors to the Family History Library find an amazing collection of resources collected over 120 years and hosts of friendly people with expertise available to help them. The Library delivers with an impressive cadre of 45 full and part-time staff, and perhaps unprecedented for libraries, 550 full- and part-time volunteers or “missionaries.”  The volunteers hail from all over the world, many of them dedicating up to 18 months—at their own expense—to help patrons make successful discoveries. 

The main floor of the library is specifically designed to assist inexperienced patrons in getting started. The floor has been outfitted with computers supported by volunteers trained to assist beginners. Volunteers and expert reference staff are also available for more in-depth research on the other floors dedicated to records from certain areas of the world. 

On its lower level, for example, is found the largest number of Chinese clan genealogies outside Mainland ChinaThis level is also used for storing family histories, and overflow films, and books available by request.  Requests for digitalization of these and other personal books can be requested here, and is done at another facility in Salt Lake or at many of the Family History Centers and affiliate libraries. 



“The library is not a repository for original documents as is the case with specialized archives; it is not an archive in that sense,” noted David Rencher, chief genealogy officer for FamilySearch. “But it accepts donations of published works of genealogical significance.” Books and serials are continually added to the library’s shelves—over 600,000 in fact—and the library is heading up an initiative with other public libraries to digitally publish historic books of genealogical relevance online—over 225,000 have been digitally published online to-date.  

Future of the Family History Library 

The library is focused on continuing to expand access to the world’s genealogical record collections to satisfy growing consumer demands. In 1985, the average patron was mostly retirees or professional researchers. Today, the patron faces are changing. It is common to see working professionals, families, and even a growing number of youth amidst the stereotypical retirees and serious researchers,” said Loosle  
       
Loosle sees a bright future for the library. “The library is still the best place to do family history research and will continue to serve that purpose. In addition, the library has created a lab for testing discovery concepts called the Discovery Centera family-friendly area where families, and particularly young people, can begin the journey of self and family discovery through fun and engaging activities. Over time, similar experiences are planned to be incorporated in the Family History Library. We anticipate the exciting additions will attract thousands of new patrons who want to discover their family history.

The library will continue to develop and offer timely, free guest classes broadcasted as webinars. The schedules, necessary connection links, downloadable handoutsand recordings to past webinars are accessible online through the FamilySearch WikiThe library also hosts a community block party in June. This year over 3,200 participants came and enjoyed a free family day including bounce houses, face painting, cultural entertainment, family history centric activities and classes. The 2016 party is tentatively scheduled for Saturday, June 11.  

Begin your family discovery at the Family History Library, online at FamilySearch.org or through a local FamilySearch Family History Center.   

### 

About FamilySearch 

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a  
nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 130 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Win A Free 3-Day Pass to RootsTech 2016!


I am so excited that I will be attending RootsTech 2016 as an Ambassador next year! I've watched RootsTech sessions via live streaming in past years, but haven't ever attended RootsTech in person. I am just so thrilled that I finally get to attend RootsTech in person next year!

As a RootsTech 2016 Ambassador, I have the opportunity to give away a free 3-Day Pass to RootsTech 2016, valued at $249, to one of my wonderful readers. This pass will include:

  • Over 200 classes
  • Keynotes
  • General sessions
  • Getting Started classes
  • Expo hall
  • Evening events

RootsTech Expo Hall

RootsTech 2016 will be held February 3-6, 2016 at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. RootsTech is the largest family history conference in the world. At last year's RootsTech, there were more than 23,000 registered attendees from 49 U.S. states and 39 countries. It truly is a global conference.

RootsTech Class

Okay! It's giveaway time! For a chance to win a free 3-Day RootsTech Pass, click on the "ENTER HERE" link below.




I've included something fun with my giveaway. After you enter your email address, look for the "bonus entries" opportunities to increase your chances to win a 3-Day RootsTech 2016 Pass.

If you've already purchased a RootsTech Pass and you're the lucky winner of this giveaway, no problem! You will receive a full refund. How's that for awesome!?

This contest begins on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 and ends on Tuesday, October 27, 2015. The winner will be selected at random on Wednesday, October 28, 2015.

Thanks for reading and good luck contestants!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, October 16, 2015

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for October 16, 2015


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. How to Add Photo Metadata Without Special Software AND How to Use Evernote for Genealogists Book Review by Denise Levenick, author of The Family Curator
  2. Social Media Decodes Long Last Family Letters by Amie Bowser Tennant for RootsBid Blog
  3. Rearranging things by Janet Hovorka, author of The Chart Chick
  4. Contest--Win RootsTech 2016 Free Registration! by Lara, author of Lara's Family Search
  5. What a Great site for Free Canadian Records AND The Father and two sons, Their Loyalist Documentation, and my Loyal Cousin by Barbara Poole, author of Life From The Roots
  6. Tuesday’s Tip: Use TinyPNG to Reduce Blog Image Size AND Review: How to Use Evernote for Genealogy by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  7. Ten Things to Know About Researching a Witch in Your Family Tree by Heather Wilkinson Rojo, author of Nutfield Genealogy
  8. It Suddenly Came to Me AND Savior, again to Thy dear name we ...Dennis and I... raise by Becky Jamison, author of Grace and Glory
  9. Record Browsing Has Benefits by Joanne Cowden, author of Researching Relatives
  10. Is DNA a genealogical miracle? by Gary Roberts, author of Backtracking The Common
  11. Thinking About My Father by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  12. Worth Every Drop of Spit--Carl Fricks Pt 2 by Michelle Ganus Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
  13. Workin' on the Railroad! by Dianne Nolin, author of Genealogy: Beyond the BMD
  14. October in the USA, Halloween and Family History Month by Carol Bowen Stevens for Worldwide Genealogy ~ A Genealogical Collaboration
  15. How to Find Everything and Anything on YouTube by The Cousin Detective, author of The Cousin Detective Blog
  16. TUESDAY TIP: INDICES ARE NOT RECORDS by Kathryn Lake Hogan, author of Looking 4 Ancestors
  17. Private George Robert TODD 15086 died 16th September 1916 aged 27 by Simon Last, author of Charnwood Genealogy

This week's "May I Introduce To You" Interview on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discovery

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Blogosphere Last Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Jana's Place

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

RootsTech Early Bird Pricing Extended


In a previous post, I shared the news that the RootsTech early bird prices would expire on October 15, 2015. If you missed the opportunity to take advantage of those wonderful early bird discount prices, don't despair. We received great news from RootsTech. The early bird prices have been extended and are valid until October 19, 2015.

Here's yesterday's announcement from RootsTech:

Early bird pricing has been extended till Monday, October 19.

You've still got time to purchase a 4-day RootsTech Pass at the early bird price of just $149. Regularly priced at $249, that's a $100 savings!

A full RootsTech conference pass includes access to:

  • Over 200 RootsTech classes of all experience levels taught by industry professionals.*
  • The huge expo hall with hundreds of family history and technology exhibitors.
  • Daily keynote sessions with inspiring and well-known speakers.
  • Evening events with popular entertainers.

With over 200 classes to choose from, keynote sessions with inspirational and nationally recognized speakers, evening events with special guest performers, an expo hall with hundreds of exhibitors, and more, RootsTech 2016 will be an experience not to be missed!

Join us and register today to experience RootsTech, the largest family history conference in the world, happening February 3-6, 2016, at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah.

REGISTER TODAY

*A few select RootsTech classes will begin on Wednesday, February 3 at 3:00 p.m. Wednesday classes do not include Getting Started classes. The Getting Started track of classes will start on Thursday, February 4. Click here to view the complete listing of RootsTech classes.

Want to experience more at RootsTech? Experience the Innovator Summit.

Want an insider look into the future of family history innovation and business? Join us at the 2016 RootsTech Innovator Summit where developers, entrepreneurs, business leaders, and others gather to collaborate to accelerate the future of family history innovation. A RootsTech plus Innovator Summit pass is available for purchase at the early bird discount price of $169.

Learn more about the Innovator Summit here.

RootsTech, hosted by FamilySearch, is a global conference celebrating families across generations, where people of all ages are inspired to discover, preserve, and share their family stories and connections. This annual event has become the largest of its kind in the world, attracting tens of thousands of participants worldwide.

For more information about RootsTech 2016, visit RootsTech.org.

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Selling Land on William's Behalf

In a previous post, I shared the guardianship record of William Wesley Rardin. From that record, it appears that William's maternal uncle, Daniel B. Webster, was appointed as his guardian.

I'd like to share another probate record concerning William Wesley Rardin with you today. This time it's a Petition to Sell Real Estate.1


The petition is dated 24 December 1858, which is only about two months after Daniel B. Webster was appointed as William's guardian. In 1858, William was about ten years old.

Transcript of the Petition to Sell Real Estate

In the Matter of Daniel B. Webster  }
Guardian of Wm Wesley Rardin        }        Petition to Sell Real Estate
                    vs                                         }
Wm Wesley Rardin (a Minor)             }

This cause came on to be heard and no person appearing for the Defendant; and the court being satisfied that the Defendant has been duly notified of the pending and prayer of petition, and that it will be for the benefit of said Minor to sell the Real Estate in said Petition mentioned. On a Counsel for Petition it is ordered that George S. Simpson, Peter Grovsenor & S. W. Foreman, being first duly sworn according to Law, do upon actual view of the premises, appraise the Real Estate in said petition mentioned as the property of Wm Wesley Rardin: described as follows to wit; one undivided 1/2 of 1/2 of 3/4 of Section No 23. Town No 6. in Range No 12 in the Ohio company's purchase, in the County of Athens and State of Ohio. And of their proceedings make due return forthwith to this Court. 
Calvary Morris Prob Judge
This document is very interesting. I didn't know William had any property to sell. Where did he get this property? Did he inherit it? If so, from whom? I didn't see anything about property being given to William by his maternal grandmother, Mary (Tyler) Webster, in her will. Why was it necessary to sell William's property at the time of this petition? It stated that it would be for his benefit. Where were his parents? If they were alive at this time, were they having financial difficulties? Were they unable to support William? Did they have a say regarding this petition to sell William's property? Did they agree with the decision to sell the property?

As you can see, I have lots of questions. I still don't know for sure when William's parents, Moses Rardin and Samantha (Webster) Rardin, passed away. I've found conflicting evidence regarding Samantha's date of death, which I will share in a future post. There are other probate records regarding William Wesley Rardin which I will also share in future posts.

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved



1 "Ohio, Probate Records, 1789-1996," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-27661-22796-8?cc=1992421 : accessed 1 October 2015), Athens > Probate journals 1852-1871 vol 1-2 > image 224 of 597; county courthouses, Ohio.

Friday, October 9, 2015

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for October 9, 2015


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Who Wants to be a Genealogy Rock Star? I’d Rather be a HERO by Jen Alford, author of Jenealogy
  2. It's Raining, It's Pouring! by Cheri Hudson Passey for Worldwide Genealogy ~ A Genealogical Collaboration
  3. Using the 1890 Civil War Veterans Census by Amy Johnson Crow, author of Amy Johnson Crow Blog
  4. Our Adventures at the Genealogy Roadshow by Dan Young, author of Discovering Your Past
  5. Introducing the Little Family Tree app by Melissa Finlay, author of Finlay Family
  6. Family History Mail by Caitlin Gow, author of Genealogically Speaking
  7. Education–Intermediate AND Education–Advanced by Michele Simmons Lewis, author of Ancestoring
  8. "Finished" Family Line Is Questioned AND How'd She Do That?! : Sharing on Pinterest by Amie Bowser Tennant, author of My Kith N Kin
  9. Should I Trash My Genealogy Papers? by Kerry Scott, author of Clue Wagon
  10. Celebrating My Very Own Patriot! by Jacqi Stevens, author of A Family Tapestry
  11. Tuesday's Tip: Attend, Online, the National Archives Virtual Genealogy Fair on October 21-22 by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  12. Family History Eagle Scout Projects by Janet Hovorka, author of Zap the Grandma Gap
  13. Solving a Mystery with Military Records AND Deflecting Web Attacks by James Tanner, author of Genealogy's Star
  14. After One Year: Amazing Support by Joanne Cowden, author of Researching Relatives
  15. Military Monday - Military Service in Sweden by Anna Matthews, author of Tripping Over My Roots
  16. 5 reasons to learn how to use the GRS even if you’re not planning to join DAR by Bryna O'Sullivan
  17. Your Genealogical Education by Sheri Fenley, author of The Educated Genealogist
  18. The Facebook of Their Day by Tien Le, author of The Lazy Genealogist
  19. Contest: Win a Copy of How to Use Evernote for Genealogy from Shop Family Tree by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  20. 8 Ways to Celebrate Family History Month! by Allison for Legacy Tree Genealogists Blog
  21. Web Sleuthing––Chattanooga Public Library by Michelle Ganus Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
  22. Another Sad Chapter of Reuben Ward, Murdered Minister: A Case of an Insolvent Estate by Dana Leeds, author of The Enthusiastic Genealogist

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

This week's "May I Introduce To You" Interview on GeneaBloggers.com

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Blogosphere Last Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

William Wesley Rardin's Guardian

In a previous post I shared the Last Will and Testament of my 4th great-grandmother Mary (Tyler) Webster. Her grandson William Wesley Webster was mentioned in her will.1 Mary gave William the sum of one-hundred dollars in Item One of her will.

Further research in the probate records on FamilySearch produced this document about William. It's a guardianship record. My records indicate that William was born around 1848. This record was dated 14 October 1858, so William would have been around ten years old at the time.


Transcription of Probate Document
Probate Court Athens County Oct 14th 1858
In the matter of Wm Wesley Rardin Minor child of Samantha Rardin. On motion to the Court It is ordered that Daniel B. Webster be appointed Guardian of Said Minor and that he give Bond in the sum of Five hundred Dollars with Daniel B. Stewart Surity, conditioned according to Law, and thereupon the Said Guardian, having first filed the statement of the Estate of his Said Ward according to Law, appeared in open Court, accepted said appointment, gave Bond accordingly, & having been sworn as the Law directs. Letters of Guardianship were issued to him.
Calvary Morris Prob Judge
William Wesley Rardin's appointed guardian was Daniel B. Webster. William's mother had a brother named Daniel Bromley Webster. So, I think it's safe to assume that William's guardian was his Uncle Daniel.

My knowledge about probate records is not what I'd like it to be. I had questions about guardianship law in Ohio during this time period. I tried to find answers online on my own, but couldn't seem to find the answers I was seeking. So, I turned to Facebook. I belong to several genealogy Facebook groups and asked my questions in two of those groups - Genealogy Bloggers and Genealogy! Just Ask!. I also asked my questions in my own timeline as well. Within a very short time, wonderfully helpful fellow genealogists were coming to my aid. I wondered about the circumstances that would require guardianship of a minor child. For example, would the guardianship mean the child was orphaned?

These wonderful genealogy friends of mine answered my questions. Several people said that no, the child does not have to be an orphan to have a guardian. A couple of interesting links were shared with me as well. Here they are ~ Guardians for the kids? by Judy G. Russell and Ohio Probate Records in the FamilySearch Wiki.

Probate records really are fascinating. They give us an interesting glimpse into the lives of our ancestors.

I found additional probate records that pertain to William Wesley Rardin and will share those in future posts.

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved


1 "Ohio, Probate Records, 1789-1996," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-27661-22836-43?cc=1992421 : accessed 1 October 2015), Athens > Probate journals 1852-1871 vol 1-2 > image 218 of 597; county courthouses, Ohio.

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Take Advantage of RootsTech 2016 Early Bird Prices


Can you believe it's already October? Where has the year gone? 

This is just a friendly reminder that the Early Bird discount pricing window for RootsTech 2016 will be closing soon. The Early Bird discount for RootsTech 2016 passes ends on October 15, 2015. That's only a little over a week away.

The savings with the Early Bird discount is quite significant. For instance, the Early Bird price for a RootsTech Pass is $149. Full price for that pass is $249. That's a $100 savings! And the RootsTech + Innovator Summit Pass is $169 versus the full price of $269, another savings of $100! There are other RootsTech Pass options as well. Check out the 2016 RootsTech Pass Comparison chart by clicking HERE

I've already registered and am really looking forward to attending RootsTech 2016. Don't miss out on RootsTech's Early Bird discount prices.

See you at RootsTech 2016!

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Monday, October 5, 2015

FamilySearch and the DAR at The BYU Conference on Family History & Genealogy

I attended the BYU Conference on Family History & Genealogy in July of this year as an official blogger. I had a wonderful time at the conference. This will be my last blog post as an official blogger. I want to thank those in charge of the conference for the opportunity I had to attend and blog about my experiences there.

Here's the view of the BYU Conference Center where the BYU Conference on Family History & Genealogy was held.


Upon entering the front doors, this sign greeted us. As you can see from the sign, the Harman Building is to the left and the Conference Center is to the right.


And here's the friendly and helpful staff at the front desk of the Conference Center.


I took the photos above on Friday, July 31st, which was the last day of the conference. The previous day, Thursday, July 30th, I stopped by the rooms where FamilySearch and the DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) were located and took some pictures.

When I stopped by the room where the DAR was located I chatted with the very nice and helpful staff. They answered my questions and gave me some pamphlets. I am eligible to join the DAR through my patriot ancestor Dr. Luther L. Waterman, who was a surgeon in the Revolutionary War.


Here are a few photos from their room filled with lovely displays.



This is the display for the Children of the American Revolution.


FamilySearch offered free book and photo scanning in Room 2285. They also had a computer lab in Room 2283.


Here are a couple photos from the FamilySearch Computer Lab.



And here's a sign from the book and photo scanning room.


I'm honored to announce that I've been asked to be an official blogger for next year's BYU Conference on Family History & Genealogy.

Thanks for reading!


© 2015 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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