Friday, March 28, 2014

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for March 28, 2014

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My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Minnesota Online Historical Newspapers Summary by Kenneth R. Marks, author of THE ANCESTOR HUNT
  2. Using Books at Google by Midge Frazel, author of Granite in My Blood
  3. Student Genealogy Grant Recipients: Checking in with Elyse Doerflinger by Denise Levenick, author of The Family Curator
  4. A Timeline for William Gow. by Caitlin Gow, author of Genealogically Speaking.
  5. And now I’m 3! by Debi Austen, author of Who Knew?
  6. FamilySearch Catalog Will Soon Link to the OCLC World Catalog by Steve Anderson for FamilySearch Blog
  7. “Reasonably exhaustive” research as a process of elimination by Michael Hait, author of Planting the Seeds
  8. Concord, Massachusetts -- Civil War Memorial by Barbara Poole, author of Life From The Roots
  9. Which Way Do I Go Now? Organize a Genealogy Research Plan by Lisa Louise Cook, author of Lisa Louise Cook's Genealogy Gems
  10. Wash Day and Our Ancestors by Thomas MacEntee for Saving Memories Forever Blog
  11. Take Your Kids to Cemeteries (Please) by Emily Kowalski Schroeder, author of The Spiraling Chains: Kowalski – Bellan Family Trees
  12. Obfuscated FamilySearch Family Tree Manual by Ancestry Insider, author of The Ancestry Insider
  13. Family Tree DNA Announces the March mtDNA Madness Sale - The Benefits of Full Mitochondrial DNA Sequencing by CeCe Moore, author of Your Genetic Genealogist
  14. A Trip Down Memory Lane by Julie Goucher, author of Anglers Rest
  15. Get your free e-book! 'Family History: A New Start' by Robin Foster, author of Saving Stories
  16. Why Having a Family History Blog is SOOO Important! by L. L. Moore, author of Moore History – Deep In The Heart of Texas
  17. Finding Female Ancestors in the Newspaper by Kimberly Powell for About.com Genealogy
  18. Family Search seeking volunteer indexers AND Don’t let the backlog get you down by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
  19. Haplogroup Comparisons Between Family Tree DNA and 23andMe by Roberta Estes, author of DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy
  20. Weird Search Terms 2014 by Heather Wilkinson Rojo, author of Nutfield Genealogy

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Monday, March 24, 2014

52 Ancestors: #12 ~ Happy Birthday Dad! We Miss You!

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.

Yesterday was my dad's birthday. He would have turned 78 years old. He passed away almost five years ago.
Jan Albert Iverson in 1938 - 2 Years Old
Jan Albert Iverson ~ 2 Years Old

My dad, Jan Albert Iverson, was born on March 23, 1936 to his parents, Ingrid Anna Gillberg and Arthur Harry Iverson. He was the second of four children born to Ingrid and Arthur. Jan had an older sister named Joan and two younger siblings. His younger siblings are still living, so I won't give their names here for privacy reasons. His older sister, Joan, passed away in 1993 from cancer.

This is a picture of my dad at his home in North Hollywood, California. I love that this picture of my dad shows the inside of the home that his father, Arthur, built with the help of others.


Jan Albert Iverson as a Young Boy

My dad spent the first ten years of his life in the Los Angeles area of California. When he was ten years old, his family moved to Portland, Oregon. This was after his mother, Ingrid, had remarried following the death of my dad's father, Arthur. Ingrid and her second husband, Wayne, had three children. One of Ingrid and Wayne's children, Pamela, passed away in 1972 at only 24 years of age. She had leukemia. Their other two children are still living, so again, I won't give their names here for privacy reasons.

My dad loved sports and played basketball, football, and track during his sophomore year of high school.

This is a picture of my dad when he was 15 years old.


Jan Albert Iverson - 15 Years Old

My dad served as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the East Central States Mission from May 1956 until May 1958. This is a picture of him taken in 1956 before his mission. He was 20 years old at the time this photo was taken. In his Mission Journal, he mentioned living and traveling in the following states: Tennessee, Kentucky, West Virginia, Ohio, Mississippi, and Maryland.

Elder Jan Albert Iverson - 20 Years Old ~ 1956

In the summer of 1958, my dad was inducted into the United States Army. He went to Basic Training at Fort Ord, California from August 1958 to October 1958. This photo of my dad was taken in October of 1959.

Jan Albert Iverson in Uniform

After he completed Basic Training, my dad served at the Presidio in San Francisco, California. While he was there, he met his future wife (my mom). Her name is Elizabeth.

They became engaged in the spring of 1959. Then came news that my dad was being sent to Korea. In August of 1959 he left for Seoul, Korea and served overseas for eleven months. He and Elizabeth wrote letters to each other while they were apart. They even sent tapes to each other. My dad was a wonderful artist. He loved to draw and paint. We have a cartoon that he had drawn showing himself sitting at a desk listening to one of the tapes Elizabeth had sent to him. I will be sharing that cute cartoon in a future post.

After his return to the United States, he and Elizabeth were married. This is a photo of my dad and mom on their wedding day.




My dad was a wonderful husband and father. He loved his family. He also had a strong testimony of the truthfulness of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. He served in many callings in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints during his lifetime.

He worked hard to provide for his family. He worked as a computer programmer for many years.


My dad had a love for genealogy and family history. He served as the Family History Center Director at our local Family History Center for about five years. My mom served as an Assistant Director alongside my dad.

It was while my dad was serving as a Family History Director that he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. He hadn't smoked during his life. The suspected cause of his cancer was acid reflux that he suffered from for years. He bravely and patiently endured the trials that went along with his cancer diagnosis. He had major surgery to remove the cancerous portion of his esophagus and then had chemotherapy and radiation treatments.

Jan Albert Iverson Grave Marker May 26, 2012

On April 29, 2009, a year and a half after being diagnosed with cancer, my dad passed away. He is very much missed by all who knew and loved him. But, we are comforted by the knowledge that we will see him again someday.

Happy Birthday Dad! We love you!

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, March 21, 2014

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for March 21, 2014


Just a reminder...I've created a new board on Pinterest called Genealogy Fab Finds. And, I'll be sharing my weekly Fab Finds posts there. If you'd like to check out this new board, click HERE.

My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Civil War Quick Tip for your New Jersey Ancestor and Civil War Quick Tip for Researching Your Veteran by Cindy Freed, author of Cindy Freed's Genealogy Circle
  2. Why is Walking Arizona moving to Utah? by James Tanner, author of Genealogy's Star
  3. Backup!! Another lesson learned by Karen Blackmore, author of Karen's Genealogy Oasis
  4. Connecting Through Find-A-Grave by Becky Jamison, author of Grace and Glory
  5. Census Keyring Thing by Beverly McGowan Norman, author of Roots, Branches, and a Few Nuts
  6. Learning: Making a Timeline... for your BLOG! by Heather Collins for Young & Savvy Genealogists
  7. Kansas Online Historical Newspapers Summary by Kenneth R. Marks, author of THE ANCESTOR HUNT
  8. Tuesday Tip - Citing Sources vs Starting an Archives? by Laura Cosgrove Lorenzana, author of The Last Leaf On This Branch
  9. Eyes on Oklahoma AND An image citation how-to by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
  10. Yet Another Good Reason to Source Your Research by Beth Foulk, author of Genealogy Decoded Blog  - Ah Ha Moments for Genealogists
  11. One Year–That was Fast! by Tracy Meyers, author of Family Preserves
  12. Creating a Digital Time Capsule for Genealogy by Nancy Loe, author of Sassy Jane Genealogy
  13. Have You Registered ? AND Family Friends Friday-Well Maybe.... by Cheri Hudson Passey, author of Carolina Girl Genealogy
  14. RootsTech 2014 Video Presentations Now Available Online by Steve Anderson for FamilySearch Blog
  15. A Sticky Situation - Removing Photos from Those Evil Albums by Lynn Palermo, author of The Armchair Genealogist
  16. New Records Available for Research Online by Ohio Historical Society Collections Blog
  17. Keeping Busy With My Writing by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small
  18. A Fun Family Tree Feature by Larry Cragun, author of Larry Cragun Family And Genealogy Blog
  19. Newspapers.com: A Second Look by Rorey Cathcart, author of The Who Hunter

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!

© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

William Barker Engle's Death Certificate

Yesterday I introduced you to William Barker Engle. He and his brother, Charles, were bachelors all of their lives. And they lived in the same house together for about 20 years at 1308 Marengo Avenue in South Pasadena, California. Charles passed away in their home in 1946. William passed away four years later in 1950. But, he did not pass away at his home. How do I know this? Because of the valuable document I'm sharing with you today. It's William's death certificate.

William Barker Engle Death Cert

But, before I share the information contained in this document, I want to make the point that the information contained in this document is only as accurate as the person providing the information for it. For instance, who was the informant? Were they a close family member? Or was it someone unfamiliar with William's family history?

With that in mind, let's see what information we can glean from William's death certificate.
  1. Full Name: William Barker Engle
  2. Date of Death: June 1, 1950 at 4:30 AM
  3. Sex: Male
  4. Color or Race: Caucasian
  5. Married, Never Married, Widowed, Divorced: Never Married
  6. Date of Birth: September 23, 1867
  7. Age: 82
  8. Usual Occupation: Agent, Life Ins
  9. Kind of Business or Industry: Life Insurance
  10. Birthplace: (Unknown) Ohio
  11. Citizen of What Country: USA
  12. Name of Father & Birthplace: Richard Engle, Plymouth, Ohio
  13. Maiden Name of Mother & Birthplace: Sarah Amanda Watreman (should be Waterman, probably a typo), Coolville, Ohio
  14. Name of Spouse: None
  15. Was Deceased Ever in U.S. Armed Forces: No
  16. Social Security Number: None
  17. Informant: Mrs. Ella Gray (Sister)
  18. Place of Death
    1. City or Town: Rural Puente
    2. Length of Stay (In This Place): 4 Months
    3. County: Los Angeles
    4. Full Name and Address of Hospital Or Institution: El Encanto Rest Home, 15400 East Valley Blvd.
  19. Usual Residence
    1. Street Address: 1308 Marengo Ave.
    2. City or Town: South Pasadena
    3. County: Los Angeles
    4. State: Calif.
  20. Cause of Death
    1. Disease or Condition Directly Leading to Death: Cerebral Arteriosclerosis prior to 11/28/49
    2. Other Significant Conditions: General Arteriosclerosis prior to 11/28/? (Having a difficult time deciphering the year.)
  21. Autopsy: NO
  22. Burial Date: June 6, 1950
  23. Cemetery: Mountain View Cemetery, Altadena
The informant for William's death was his sister, Ella Eliza (Engle) Gray.

It's interesting that only four years after Charles Engle's death, the California death certificate form had changed. William's death certificate was different from his brother Charles' death certificate.

Also interesting to note is that William's occupation was listed as a life insurance agent at the time of his death. In the 1940 census, he was listed as a real estate salesman. But, he had been a life insurance agent for many years before that.

William passed away at El Encanto Rest Home in Puente, California. And he was there for four months before he died. In the 1940 census, William and his brother Charles had two lodgers living with them. I wonder if William had lodgers living with him after his brother Charles passed away in 1946. And if he did, I wonder if these lodgers stayed at his home after William went to live at the rest home. Also, what happened to this home after his death? Did it stay in the family or was it sold?

I checked on Zillow.com and according to this website, the Engle's home at 1308 Marengo Avenue in South Pasadena was built in 1910 and was last remodeled in 1912. The last time it was sold was in 1979. Unfortunately, it didn't show sales data prior to 1979. It would have been very interesting to see when William's mother, Sarah, bought the house. I know she and her sons, Charles and William, were living there by 1920, because 1308 Marengo Avenue was their address in the 1920 census.

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

52 Ancestors: #11 ~ William Barker Engle ~ The Other Bachelor Brother

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small. 

In last week's 52 Ancestors post, I told you about Charles Albert Engle, who was Mary Albertina Engle's twin brother. In that post, I mentioned that Charles and his brother William, lived together for about 20 years. I also said I would tell you about William in a future post. So, today I'd like to introduce you to William Barker Engle.


William Barker Engle Letterhead

But, before I tell you about William, I'd like to share the top portion of a letter written by him. That's his signature above "Conservator of Estates." This letter was found in his father's Civil War pension file. William had written to the Veterans Administration in Washington D.C. after the death of his mother, Sarah Amanda (Waterman) Engle. I'll share the entire letter in a future post. It's quite interesting. This letter was dated January 9, 1940. This letterhead is interesting because it tells us a little about William's occupation. But, before we get into that, let's start at the beginning.

William was born on 23 September 1867 in Marion, Morgan, Ohio to his parents, Richard Engle and Sarah Amanda Waterman. He was the fifth of seven children born to Richard and Sarah.


In 1876,1 William and his family moved from Ohio to Iowa. And in the 1880 Census,2 we find William living with his parents and siblings in Barclay, Black Hawk, Iowa. At that time, William was 12 years old. He was attending school, along with his older sister, Mary, and younger brother, Edwin. His older brother, Charles, was helping his father, who was a farmer.

Sometime before 1895, William's parents moved from Iowa to South Dakota. Richard and Sarah Engle were found in the 1895 South Dakota State Census.3 They were living in Willow Lake Township in Brule County. But, William was not living with them at this time. Neither were any of his siblings. I'm not sure where William and his siblings were in 1895.


Thankfully, William showed up again in the 1900 U.S. Federal Census.4 He was living alone at 216 East 5th Street in East Waterloo, Black Hawk, Iowa, which is only about a block from the Cedar River. This is a map showing a portion of East Waterloo as it appears today. And that pin shows William's address in the 1900 census. Thank you GoogleMaps for this image.



William was single at the time the 1900 census was taken. Also, this is the first census that states William's occupation. He was listed as an Insurance Agent (Life). It appears that he worked in the insurance industry for most of his life.

By 1910, William had moved west and was living with his widowed mother, Sarah. Sarah had moved to California about a year earlier.1 In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census,5 William was 42 years old, single, and living with his mother at 815 Park Avenue in South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California. Again, William's occupation was listed as an insurance agent.

By 1920, William's unmarried brother, Charles, joined him and his mother in California. And in the 1920 6 and 1930 7 U. S. Federal Censuses, William and his brother, Charles, were living with their mother, Sarah, at 1308 Marengo Avenue in South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California.


In the 1920 census, William's occupation was listed as "Insurance" and the industry was listed as "Life." William's occupation was still listed as Insurance in the 1930 census, but the industry had changed to real estate.

In the 1940 U.S. Federal Census 8 William and his brother, Charles, were still living at the same address in South Pasadena, but their mother had passed away in 1939. Now, they had two boarders living with them. By the time the 1940 census was taken, William's occupation had changed slightly. He was still in the real estate industry, but his occupation was listed as a salesman.


Sadly, I don't have a picture of William. But I do have his signature, which is included in the letterhead at the top of this post. And personally, I love to see the signatures of my ancestors and others in my family tree.

William Barker Engle Letterhead

Like his brother Charles, William remained a bachelor his entire life. He and Charles lived in the same house for about 20 years. It was at this house that Charles passed away in 1946. William passed away on 1 June 1950 in Rural Puente, Los Angeles County, California. This information was taken from his death certificate. I will be sharing William's death certificate in a future post.

William and Charles Engle Grave Marker

William and his brother Charles share a grave marker. They are both buried at Mountain View Cemetery in Altadena, Los Angeles, California.

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved




1 Sarah's Obituary
2 Year: 1880; Census Place: Barclay, Black Hawk, Iowa; Roll: 327; Family History Film: 1254327; Page: 358A; Enumeration District: 041; Image: 0338.
3 Ancestry.com. South Dakota, State Census, 1895 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Original data: Data indexed from images from the South Dakota State Archives microfilm collection. Sheet 3. No. 71 and 72.
4 Year: 1900; Census Place: East Waterloo, Black Hawk, Iowa; Roll: 418; Page: 7B; Enumeration District: 0013; FHL microfilm: 1240418.
5 Year: 1910; Census Place: South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California; Roll: T624_87; Page: 20B; Enumeration District: 0347; FHL microfilm: 1374100. Line 61.
6 Year: 1920; Census Place: South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California; Roll: T625_119; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 614; Image: 975. Dwelling No. 107. Line 48.
7 Year: 1930; Census Place: South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California; Roll: 175; Page: 13A; Enumeration District: 1519; Image: 398.0; FHL microfilm: 2339910. Dwelling No. 332. Line 17.
8 Year: 1940; Census Place: Pasadena, Los Angeles, California; Roll: T627_243; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 19-514. Visited No. 231. Line 14.

Friday, March 14, 2014

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for March 14, 2014

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Hello my awesome readers! As some of you may know, I'm on Pinterest. I have several genealogy boards there. Surprisingly, I get a lot of traffic on my blog from Pinterest. In fact, right now Pinterest is #3 on my list of referring sites for the month and #10 for all time. If you don't already share your genealogy blog posts on Pinterest, you may be missing out on a great thing.

So, what does this have to do with my weekly Fab Finds posts? Well, I've created a new board on Pinterest called Genealogy Fab Finds. And, I'll be sharing my weekly Fab Finds posts there. If you'd like to check out this new board, click HERE.

Now, here are my Fab Finds for this week (in no particular order)
  1. Sibling rivalry by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
  2. Hack Genealogy Mentioned in iPhone Life Magazine by Thomas MacEntee, author of Hack Genealogy
  3. Tuesday Tip: Swedish Churchbooks on-line free this weekend by Linda, author of Cousin Linda
  4. Review: Bloglovin AND Contest: Go for the Mocavo Gold by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  5. 7 Reasons Why I Like Social Media As A Genealogy Tool by Larry Cragun, author of Larry Cragun Family and Genealogy Blog
  6. Free Irish Records on Ancestry.com Through St. Patrick's Day AND US National Archives to Close Three Facilities by Diane Haddad – Genealogy Insider for Family Tree Magazine Blog
  7. RootsMapper: Another FamilySearch Family Tree Extension by Ancestry Insider, author of The Ancestry Insider
  8. Find NH Town Clerk Records On Line by Heather Wilkinson Rojo, author of Nutfield Genealogy
  9. The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) and #genchat to collaborate in 2014 by Jen Baldwin, author of Ancestral Breezes
  10. Sixteen Completely Free Ways to Research Your Family Tree in New Hampshire by Janice Brown, author of Cow Hampshire
  11. The Future Looks Exciting for FamilySearch’s Record Digitization Program by Steve Nickle for FamilySearch Blog
  12. Website to Help You Find Where Your Ancestors Where From In Mexico by Moises Garza, author of Mexican Genealogy
  13. Where are your links? by Jill Ball, author of GeniAus
  14. The Most Lethal Plague in History -- The Influenza Pandemic of 1918 by John D. Tew, author of Filiopietism Prism
  15. Family Tree DNA Launches New Learning Center by Roberta Estes, author of DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy
  16. Tonsillectomies a Hundred Years Ago by Sheryl Lazarus, author of A HUNDRED YEARS AGO
  17. Between the pages in a prayer book... by Jennifer, author of 'On a flesh and bone foundation': An Irish History
  18. Learning About Marriage Banns and Marriages by Midge Frazel, author of Granite in My Blood

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!

© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Charles Albert Engle's Death Certificate

Yesterday I shared a post about Charles Albert Engle. In that post, I mentioned that he passed away on 20 September 1946 in South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California. However, I didn't mention his cause of death. I thought I'd go ahead and share Charles' death certificate today.

Charles Albert Engle Death Cert

Let's see all of the information that can be gleaned from this document.
  1. Full Name: Charles Albert Engle
  2. Place of Death: 1308 Marengo Avenue, South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California
  3. Usual Residence: 1308 Marengo Avenue, South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California
  4. If Veteran, Name of War: None
  5. Social Security Number: None
  6. Sex: Male
  7. Color or Race: Caucasian
  8. Single, Married, Widowed or Divorced: Single
  9. Birthdate of Deceased: June 20, 1864
  10. Age: 82 Years, 3 Months, 0 Days
  11. Birthplace: Chester Hill, Ohio
  12. Usual Occupation: Retired Salesman
  13. Industry or Business: Grocery (Wholesale)
  14. Father's Name: Richard Engle
  15. Father's Birthplace: Plymouth, Ohio
  16. Mother's Name: Sarah Amanda Waterman
  17. Mother's Birthplace: Coolville, Ohio
  18. Informant: Wm. B. Engle (Brother)
  19. Informant's Address: 1308 Marengo Avenue, So. Pasadena, Calif.
  20. Burial, Cremation or Removal: Burial
  21. Burial Date: September 23, 1946
  22. Burial Place: Mountain View Cemetery, Altadena, Calif.
  23. Funeral Director: Vernon F. Steen
  24. Funeral Director Address: 11305 Magnolia Blvd., No. Hollywood, Calif.
  25. Date of Death: September 20, 1946 at 3:20 AM
  26. Cause of Death: (1) Cancer of Pancreas (2) Metastatic Cancer of Liver
  27. Autopsy: None
This death certificate is filled with very valuable family history information. Of course, it's only as accurate as the person providing the information. In the case of this document, Charles' brother, William, was the informant. William and Charles were both bachelors their entire lives. They lived together for over 20 years.

As you can see, Charles' cause of death was pancreatic cancer. It also appears that Charles also suffered from metastatic cancer of the liver, which means that the cancer had spread to his liver.

Charles passed away at his home at 1308 Marengo Avenue, in South Pasadena, California. His death must have been quite difficult for his brother William, since they had lived together for so many years.

William passed away almost four years after Charles. I will be sharing more about William's life in a future post.

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Monday, March 10, 2014

52 Ancestors: #10 ~ Charles Albert Engle – The Other Adorable Twin

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.

Mary Albertina Engle and Charles Albert Engle

This cute photo may seem familiar to my regular readers. That's because I shared it in last week's 52 Ancestors post. In that post, I wrote about Mary Albertina Engle, the adorable girl standing on the chair. I also mentioned in last week's post that in the future I would write about her twin brother, Charles, who's standing on the chair next to her.

So, today, I'd like to introduce you to Charles Albert Engle, the other adorable twin in the photo.

Charles Albert Engle was born on 20 June 1864 in Chesterhill, Morgan, Ohio to his parents, Richard Engle and Sarah Amanda Waterman.


Charles Albert Engle

When Charles and his twin sister Mary were born, their father, Richard Engle, had just been honorably discharged from active service in the Civil War.1 At the time of their births, their sister, Ella Eliza, was six years old. Their older brother, Lewis Asher, died before they were born. He died in 1862 when he was only one year old. Their younger brother, William Barker, was born when Charles and Mary were three years old. Another brother, Edwin Caleb, was born when Charles and Mary were five years old. When Charles and Mary were eleven years old, their youngest brother, Frederick, was born and sadly, died on the same day.

Charles, along with his parents and siblings, lived in Ohio until sometime before 1880. They moved from Ohio to Iowa. In 1880, the family is found in the U.S. Federal Census for Barclay, Black Hawk, Iowa.2 The Engle family lived in Iowa for a number of years before moving to South Dakota. However, I don't know when Charles moved to South Dakota. His parents, Richard and Sarah Engle, are found in the 1895 South Dakota State Census in Willow Lake Township, in Brule County.3 But Charles is not listed with his parents in this census.

In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census,4 Charles was living with his parents in Sioux Falls, Minnehaha, South Dakota. He was 35 years of age and his occupation was listed as a grocery salesman.

I haven't been able to locate Charles' whereabouts between 1900 and 1920. I can't find him in the 1910 census. However, he wrote several postcards to his mother, Sarah, between those years. These postcards were sent from several different locations. I've shared one of them recently here on this blog. It shows that in June of 1905 he was in Denver, Colorado. It could have been a business trip or perhaps he was on vacation there. If you'd like to see this interesting postcard, click
HERE.

Charles Albert Engle never married. He remained a bachelor his entire life. It also appears that Charles remained in the grocery business for the rest of his life until he retired.

In the 1920 U.S. Federal Census,5 he and his unmarried brother, William, were living with their widowed mother, Sarah, at 1308 Marengo Avenue in South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California. Charles' occupation is listed as a salesman in the groceries industry.

In the 1930 U.S. Federal Census,6 Charles and his brother, William, were still living with their mother, Sarah, at the same address in South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California. Sarah was 94 years old at the time this census was taken. In this census, Charles is listed as a traveling salesman in the groceries industry. He was 65 years old.

By the time the 1940 U.S. Federal Census7 was taken, Charles' mother, Sarah, had passed away. She died in 1939 at 103 years of age. Charles and his brother, William, still lived in the same house they had lived in at the time the 1920 and 1930 censuses were taken. By this time, Charles was no longer employed. But, his younger brother, William was. Unfortunately, it looks like William hadn't earned any income because the amount in the income column of the census was zero. Charles and William did have two lodgers living with them though.

Charles Albert Engle passed away on 20 September 1946 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California at 82 years of age. He was buried at Mountain View Cemetery in Altadena, Los Angeles, California.

Several years ago, our family visited this cemetery and were able to take photos of the grave marker for Charles and his brother William, as well as the grave markers for his parents Richard and Sarah Engle, who are also buried at this cemetery. As you can see, Charles and his brother William share the same grave marker.

William and Charles Engle Grave Marker

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved



1 Richard Engle Civil War Pension File
2 Year: 1880; Census Place: Barclay, Black Hawk, Iowa; Roll: 327; Family History Film: 1254327; Page: 358A; Enumeration District: 041; Image: 0338.
3 Ancestry.com. South Dakota, State Census, 1895 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002. Sheet 3, Line No. 71 and 72.
4 Year: 1900; Census Place: Sioux Falls Ward 6, Minnehaha, South Dakota; Roll: 1553; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 0265; FHL microfilm: 1241553. Dwelling No. 217. Line 15.
5 Year: 1920; Census Place: South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California; Roll: T625_119; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 614; Image: 975. Dwelling No. 107. Line 47.
6 Year: 1930; Census Place: South Pasadena, Los Angeles, California; Roll: 175; Page: 13A; Enumeration District: 1519; Image: 398.0; FHL microfilm: 2339910. Dwelling No. 332. Line 16.
7 Year: 1940; Census Place: Pasadena, Los Angeles, California; Roll: T627_243; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 19-514. Visited No. 231. Line 13.

Friday, March 7, 2014

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for March 7, 2014

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My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Back for a Fifth Year: Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women's History Month by Lisa Alzo, author of The Accidental Genealogist
  2. Mobile App for Find A Grave Now Available for Download by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  3. Exploring New Formats for Genealogy Instruction AND Fun with Search Terms by Amy Coffin, author of The We Tree Genealogy Blog
  4. Will Our Grandchildren Need Paleography? by Michelle G. Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
  5. It’s Now Easier Than Ever to Track Your Ancestors in the US Census Records by Tim Cross for FamilySearch Blog
  6. 1,000 Batches Indexed, Who Knew? by Julie Cahill Tarr, author of Julie's Genealogy & History Hub
  7. Genea-Musings Flipboard Magazine Gets Noticed by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  8. Student Genealogy Grant Call for Applications by Denise Levenick, author of The Family Curator
  9. It Takes A Village: Mystery Solved! by Amy, author of Brotmanblog: A Family Journey
  10. Forgotten Ashes by Angela Kraft, author of Leaves Of Heritage
  11. Using Google Books in Genealogy Research by Lee Drew, author of Family History With The Lineagekeeper
  12. Yes! NGS 2014 Announces Livestream Sessions! by Cheri Hudson Passey, author of Carolina Girl Genealogy
  13. Postcard address unknown… by Simon Last, author of charnwoodgenealogy
  14. GENEALOGY MYTHBUSTERS AND EXTREME GENES by Dayna Jacobs, author of On Granny's Trail
  15. World War II Genealogy: More Than Soldiers by Rorey Cathcart, author of The Who Hunter
  16. Getty Images: not quite free to use by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
  17. Photograph Analysis: A Vintage Photo Strip by Melanie Frick, author of Homestead Genealogical Research

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Engle Family Postcards ~ Half Way House to Pikes Peak - 1905

This is part of a series of posts in which I am sharing the Engle family vintage postcards that were found in a second-hand shop in Galway, Ireland. To view more of these postcards, please visit The Engle Family Postcard Adventure tab at the top of this blog.

The postcard I'm sharing with you today is dated June 21, 1905. It was addressed to Mrs. R. Engle, Sioux Falls, S. D.

June 21, 1905 - Postcard from Chas. A. Engle to Mrs. R. Engle

I think it's fascinating that only the city was needed for this postcard to be delivered successfully to Mrs. R. Engle.

June 21, 1905 - Postcard from Chas. A. Engle to Mrs. R. Engle

Mrs. R. Engle was Sarah Amanda (Waterman) Engle. She was my maternal 2nd great-grandaunt. This postcard was sent to Sarah from Chas. A. Engle.

Chas A. Engle is short for Charles Albert Engle. He was one of Sarah's sons.

It's interesting that there is no space for a message on the back of this postcard. In fact, it specifically says, "This side is exclusively for the address." You can see that statement at the bottom left corner on the back of the postcard. So, what did Charles do? He just wrote a little message to his mom on the front of the postcard.


I decided to enlarge the writing on the front of the postcard for easier viewing.

Halfway House to Pikes Peak Engle Family Postcard June 21, 1905

Here's the transcription of what Charles wrote:
Denver 6/21 – 1905
Am having fine time
Can eat 4 times a day.
Chas A. Engle
In the 1900 U.S. Federal Census, Charles is listed as living with his parents, Richard and Sarah Engle, in Sioux Falls Ward 6, Minnehaha, South Dakota.1



Charles was 35 years old, single, and his occupation was listed as a Grocery Salesman.

The postcard I'm sharing with you today
shows the Half Way House to Pikes Peak. According to an article about the
Manitou and Pike's Peak Railway on Wikipedia, there was a Half Way House Hotel near this railway.

A Wikipedia article about Pikes Peak states that it is "a mountain in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains." It is 14,115 feet high and is a designated National Historic Landmark.

Charles wrote this postcard while he was in Denver, according to his message. So, what was Charles doing in Denver in June of 1905? Was he there on business and just bought this pretty postcard at a shop because he liked it? Or was he there on vacation and bought this particular postcard because he actually went to the top of Pikes Peak?

If Charles actually did travel to the top of Pikes Peak, did he stop at the Half Way House on his way to the summit? Did he actually stay at this hotel?

And what did he mean by "can eat 4 times a day?" What was that about? If Charles did stay at this hotel, maybe they fed their guests 4 times a day.

So many questions remain about this postcard and why Charles purchased it. Unfortunately, at this time, I don't have the answers to these questions. But, it is a very interesting postcard nonetheless.


Thanks for stopping by!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved




1 Year: 1900; Census Place: Sioux Falls Ward 6, Minnehaha, South Dakota; Roll: 1553; Page: 12A; Enumeration District: 0265; FHL microfilm: 1241553.

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