Friday, January 31, 2014

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for January 31, 2014

Yellow Poppies
My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. “Photos” Feature Now Called “Memories” by Matt Wright for FamilySearch Blog
  2. Militia Units and Volunteer Units – What’s the Difference? by Beth Foulk, author of Genealogy Decoded
  3. Tagging in the To-Do list AND Tagging in the Master Location List AND Tagging in the Master Source List by Michele Simmons Lewis, author of Ancestoring
  4. RT 1082 by Jen Baldwin, author of Ancestral Breezes
  5. Back to Blogging by Maureen Taylor, author of Maureen Taylor – The Photo Detective
  6. Geeking Out on DNA at the APG Conference AND Happy 4th Blogiversary! by Michelle Goodrum, author of The Turning of Generations
  7. Facebook for Genealogy: Posts, aka Queries by Cyndi Ingle, author of Cyndi's List
  8. January 28, 1986 AND I'm Going to Jamboree! So You'll be able to Read All About it Here in June! by Heather Wilkinson Rojo, author of Nutfield Genealogy
  9. Elphind Updates Its List of Newspaper Titles AND 13 Reasons to Research Applications for Genealogy by Kenneth R. Marks, author of The Ancestor Hunt
  10. Dear Randy: Why Do You Write the 52 Ancestors Friday Posts? by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  11. RootsTech Updates and News by Amy Coffin, author of The We Tree Genealogy Blog
  12. Disneyland and Intergenerational Transmission by Janet Hovorka, author of Zap the Grandma Gap
  13. Following Your Favorite Blogs Using Feedly by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small
  14. Keeping Your Leaves in Order... File Naming by Eric Stitt, author of Genealogy by Eric
  15. 'Dear Ancestor' by Caitlin Gow, author of Genealogically Speaking.
  16. City directories: a great resource, used carefully by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
  17. England Research can help Czech Research by Kate Challis, author of Czech Out Your Ancestors!
  18. GeneaBloggers On Vacation . . . Down Under by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  19. It’s Our 4th Birthday! by Ruth Blair, author of The Passionate Genealogist
  20. Earle, Earle, Earle by Debi Austen, author of Who Knew?

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge -

52 Ancestors: Week 4 Recap by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Monday, January 27, 2014

52 Ancestors: #4 ~ The Photo Album of a Civil War Veteran – Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.

This is the front cover of Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's photo album. The album belongs to my 3rd cousin, Norma.

Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

I first contacted Norma in January of 2001. I sent an email to her regarding some information she had put on the Ancestry World Tree about a relative of mine. I also asked Norma if she and I were related. It turns out that we are. And as I mentioned, we are 3rd cousins.

She and I descend from our common ancestors, Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster and his wife, Cynthia Maria
Waterman. Ebenezer and Cynthia are my 2nd great-grandparents.



Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster
Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster

Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster was born on 11 August 1838 in Racine, Meigs, Ohio and passed away on 6 May 1915 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois. He served in the Civil War in Company E of the 74th Illinois Infantry. I've written two blog posts about Ebenezer previously. If you'd like to read them, please click the links below.

Wordless Wednesday–E.P.C. Webster circa 1856


Tombstone Tuesday–Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster

Ebenezer was the father of my "Traveling Dentist" great-grandfather, Watson (Frederick) Emory Webster. My regular readers are probably very familiar with Frederick, because I've written many blog posts about his life and travels. If you're new here, and would like to read about him, I've created a landing page dedicated to him here on my blog. Here's the link for his landing page –

The Traveling Dentist

Now, back to my 3rd cousin Norma and Ebenezer's amazing photo album. Norma and I started corresponding after I first contacted her and we have shared photos and information. Norma not only inherited Ebenezer's priceless photo album, she also inherited Cynthia Maria (Waterman) Webster's photo album as well.


Our family visited Norma once many years ago, and in July of 2012, our family had the great pleasure of visiting Norma again. When we visited Norma in the summer of 2012, I took pictures of these incredible photo albums. I'd like to share pictures of Ebenezer's photo album with you today.

Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

Norma had already removed the photos from this album some time ago. I was able to scan them when we visited her.

Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

It's extra special to see Ebenezer's own handwriting on the pages of this album.

Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

I'm grateful to him for labeling these precious photos.

Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

It's remarkable that this photo album is still around for Ebenezer's descendants to enjoy!

Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

It's also amazing to think that this photo album is likely over 100 years old. And even if Ebenezer put this album together the year he died, which was 1915, that would mean this photo album is 99 years old.

Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

This is the back cover of Ebenezer's photo album.

Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster's Photo Album

This photo gives you a sense of the size of Ebenezer's and Cynthia's photo albums.

Photo Albums

I'm so grateful for the opportunity our family had to visit my 3rd cousin Norma. She was very gracious. And I'm also very grateful that we were able to see and take pictures of these remarkable photo albums.

I'll be sharing Cynthia's photo album in a future post.

Thanks for reading!

© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Saturday, January 25, 2014

Favorite Family Recipes ~ Chicken Spaghetti Olé

This recipe has become a new family favorite. It's called Chicken Spaghetti Olé. Actually, maybe I should call it Chicken Vermicelli Olé because I use vermicelli instead of spaghetti when I make this dish. I've also changed a couple other ingredients from the original recipe too. It's pretty simple to make and delicious. I hope you enjoy it!

Chicken Spaghetti Olé

As I mentioned, I've changed a couple of the ingredients in this recipe. Instead of using a 10-oz. can of diced tomatoes with green chiles called for in the original recipe, I use a 14.5 oz can of diced tomatoes and a 7 oz. can of diced green chiles.

Chicken Spaghetti Olé

I also don't include the celery called for in the original recipe. Instead I just sauté chopped onion and bell peppers.

Chicken Spaghetti Olé

This is what the dish looks like after adding all of the ingredients except for the vermicelli and chicken.

Chicken Spaghetti Olé

At this point, add the vermicelli and chicken into the sauce.

Chicken Spaghetti Olé

Here we are. All of the ingredients have been combined.

Chicken Spaghetti Olé

Spoon the combined ingredients into a greased baking dish and put it into a preheated 350° oven.

Chicken Spaghetti Olé

Here it is! Out of the oven and ready to enjoy!

Chicken Spaghetti Olé

RECIPE

Chicken Spaghetti Olé 

Ingredients 

6 ounces uncooked vermicelli
1 tablespoon butter
1 small green bell pepper, chopped (1/2 cup)
1 small onion, chopped (1/4 cup)
1 can (14.5 ounces) diced tomatoes
1 can (7 ounces) diced green chiles
1 can (8 ounces) tomato sauce
1 package (8 ounces) process cheese spread loaf, cut into cubes (Velveeta)
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon pepper
2 cups diced cooked chicken
Sliced jalapeno chilies, if desired

Directions

1. Heat oven to 350°. Grease rectangular baking dish, 13x9x2 inches. Cook and drain vermicelli as directed on package.


2. Melt butter in 12-inch skillet over medium heat. Cook bell pepper and onion in butter, stirring occasionally, until tender. Stir in tomatoes, diced green chiles, tomato sauce, cheese, salt and pepper; reduce heat to low. Heat, stirring frequently, until cheese is melted.

3. Stir in chicken and vermicelli. Spoon into baking dish. Bake uncovered about 30 minutes or until bubbly around edges. Top with chiles. 6 servings.

Adapted from Betty Crocker's Chicken Spaghetti Olé originally found in Betty Crocker’s Favorite Casseroles Booklet September 1999 .

This recipe is also online. To see the original recipe for Betty Crocker's Chicken Spaghetti Olé, click HERE.

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Friday, January 24, 2014

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for January 24, 2014

IMG_0269

Instead of trying to choose a Fab Find out of the wonderful blog posts written for the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge, I've decided to include the weekly recap at the top of my Fab Finds post each week. Please take a look at the awesome articles listed there.

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge - 52 Ancestors: Week 3 Recap

My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. "NO NEED OF DOING ANY WORRYING..." by Deb Gould, author of Deb Gould
  2. I have officially moved to my own custom domain by Kris Stewart, author of My Link to the Past
  3. Y’all Ain’t Gonna Believe This by Valerie Elkins, author of Family Cherished
  4. Oops I goofed! A Correction re Preserving Paper Treasures by Lorine McGinnis Schulze, author of The Olive Tree Genealogy
  5. It’s a Southern Thing by Michelle Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
  6. Wellcome Images Now Available Free of Charge Under the Creative Commons Attribution Licence by Dick Eastman, author of Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter
  7. Trying Out Flipboard, a Curated Magazine Website/Mobile App AND Breaking News - Ancestry Expands Groundbreaking Collaboration with Family Search by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  8. Tuesday Tip – The Moldy Truth re: North Carolina by Laura Cosgrove Lorenzana, author of The Last Leaf On This Branch
  9. Tips for RootsTech Presenters AND Win a FULL ACCESS Pass to RootsTech 2014 by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  10. Ten tips for more success with newspaper research by Robin Foster for National Genealogy Examiner
  11. C'mon Mate - Win a Prize valued at $239 by Jill Ball, author of GeniAus
  12. Ancestry.com State Research Guides by Ancestry Insider, author of The Ancestry Insider
  13. BLOGIVERSARY: NOW WE ARE SEVEN by Bill West, author of West in New England
  14. GOBSMACKED? NEHGS HAS E BOOKS TO BORROW! by Brenda Leyndyke, author of Journey to the Past
  15. Photos Update by Lynne C. VanWagenen for FamilySearch Blog
  16. 7 Tips for Mapping Out your Ancestors on Pinterest by Cody Nelson, author of Meet you in Ohio
  17. Operation War Diary by David Decker, author of FAMILY HISTORY TRACING
  18. Finding Family the New-Fashioned Way AND That Unruly X….Chromosome That Is by Roberta Estes, author of DNA eXplained – Genetic Genealogy
  19. Don't Forget This When Looking at FamilySearch.org Collections on Ancestry.com by Caroline Pointer, author of 4YourFamilyStory.com

New Blog Discovery

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Engle Family Postcards ~ Rosebud Registration, Yankton, South Dakota - 1904

Here we go! I'm ready and excited to begin sharing with you the amazing vintage Engle Family Postcards that I am so grateful to have in my possession. If you don't know the story of how I acquired these 100+ year-old postcards, I hope you will read the incredible story by clicking HERE. The story has to do with a second-hand market in Galway, Ireland, my family tree on the WikiTree website, and a wonderful new friend in Ireland named Ann.

The first postcard I'm sharing with you today happens to be the oldest postcard in my Engle Family Postcard collection. As you can see, it is dated July 22, 1904 and was addressed to Mrs. R. Engle, (W) Sioux Falls, S. D.

Engle Family Postcard

Engle Family Postcard

Mrs. R. Engle was Mrs. Sarah Amanda (Waterman) Engle, my maternal 2nd great-grandaunt.

Here's the transcription from front of the postcard:
Dear Mother -
Registered within 15 minutes after I struck the town.
W.B.E.
This postcard was from Sarah Amanda's son William Barker Engle (W.B.E.).

So, why was William in Yankton, South Dakota and what was he registering for?


I did some research to find out what this postcard was about and this is what I found.

On May 13, 1904, President Theodore Roosevelt signed a Proclamation. The Proclamation was titled Proclamation 526 - Opening of Sioux Lands of the Rosebud Reservation, South Dakota. You can read the Proclamation by clicking
HERE.

In essence, and according to this Proclamation, an agreement was made between the Sioux Indian tribe on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota and a United States Indian Inspector named James McLaughlin. This agreement was approved by Congress on April 23, 1904. In this agreement, the Sioux Indian tribe relinquished their claim to about 382,000 acres of unallotted lands to the United States of America.

On August 8, 1904 at 9:00 am, these lands were opened under the homestead and townsite laws of the United States of America.

There was a procedure put into place for those interested in acquiring these lands. And it went as follows:


Beginning on July 5, 1904 at 9:00 am, and ending on July 23, 1904 at 6:00 pm, a registration was held at Chamberlain, Yankton, Bonesteel, and Fairfax in South Dakota for those who were interested in these lands.

Qualified registrants were eligible for a drawing which began on July 28 1904. The drawing determined the order in which qualified registrants would be able to enter the homestead lands following the opening of said lands in Gregory County.

It looks like William B. Engle registered in the nick of time for the drawing, as he arrived on July 22, a day before the registration period ended.


Thousands of people registered for these homestead lands. I found an interesting newspaper article in the California Digital Newspaper Collection website stating just how many people registered. The following article is from The San Francisco Call, Volume 96, Number 51, 21 July 1904.


San Francisco Call, Volume 96, Number 51, 21 July 1904
The San Francisco Call, Volume 96, Number 51, 21 July 1904
California Digital Newspaper Collection,
Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research,
University of California, Riverside, <http://cdnc.ucr.edu>

According to this article, before William B. Engle even had a chance to register, 46,670 people had already registered! Wow! And since he registered a day later than when this paper was published, the number was likely even larger than the stated 46,670 people.

There are two questions that I don't have an answer for at this point:

  1. Was William's name picked in the drawing?
  2. Was William B. Engle registering for himself, or as an agent for his Civil War veteran father, Richard Engle?
The postcard above is quite interesting because it shows a collage of pictures showing the Registration at Yankton, South Dakota. It also named the photography studio that took these pictures. I cropped the name of the photography studio to share here.

Engle Family Postcard

I saw a picture online that showed the Janousek  & Bruhn Photography Studio on a street in Yankton, South Dakota. If you'd like to see that picture, click HERE.

I also thought it would be interesting to crop some of the pictures from the collage and share those here too. They show the long lines of people waiting to register for these homestead lands.

Engle Family Postcard

Engle Family Postcard

Engle Family Postcard

The following poem was included in this collage of pictures.

Engle Family Postcard

Isn't it amazing how much a postcard can teach us about historical events?

I will be sharing more of these amazing Engle Family Postcards in future posts.

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Monday, January 20, 2014

52 Ancestors: #3 ~ Dr. Homer Clark Waterman – Mason

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.

Homer Clark Waterman
Homer Clark Waterman

This is a photo of Homer Clark Waterman, my maternal 2nd great-granduncle. He was the sixth of twelve children born to Asher Waterman and Bathsheba Paulk.

Homer served as an Assistant Surgeon during the Civil War. I wrote about his service in a previous post. If you'd like to read it, click HERE.

In that previous post, I mentioned that Homer was a Mason. And that's what I'd like to focus on in today's post.

While doing a little research online, I came across two interesting entries about Homer in a book. The book has been digitized and is available to read and download as a PDF on Google.com. It's called Proceedings of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of the State of Ohio at its Sixty-Third Annual Grand Assembly.1 The book was published in 1893. If you'd like to read it, click
HERE.

On page 17 of this book we find the following:


Proceedings of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters ..., Issues 63-65

Transcription from highlighted paragraph on page 17 -
March 28th – Zanesville Council No. 12 to elect and install Recorder on account of the death of Companion H. C. Waterman, who had been elected Recorder, but, before installation, was summoned by the Supreme Grand Master to enter that secret vault where the designs are all drawn upon the trestle board; also, dispensation to same council to install Deputy Grand Master.
It appears that due to Homer's death on 6 March 1893, another Recorder had to be elected to take his place.

On page 42 of this book a notice was provided by J. C. Gillespie about Dr. Homer Clark Waterman.

Proceedings of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters ..., Issues 63-65

Transcription of Notice -
We are indebted to Comp. J. C. Gillespie, of Zanesville, for the following notice:
Dr. Homer Clark Waterman was born on a farm near Coolville, Athens Co., Ohio, May 28th, 1827, and died March 6th, 1893, at his home in Zanesville, Ohio, in the sixty-sixth year of his age. At an early age he began the study of medicine and graduated from Starling Medical College in Columbus, Ohio. He entered upon the practice of his profession at Middleport, Ohio, remaining there until the opening of the war when he enlisted in the Fourth Virginia Infantry. At the close of the war he resumed the practice of medicine at Middleport, but soon after he removed to Marietta and came from there to Zanesville and became a member of the Masonic bodies here.
Dr. Waterman was well known throughout the county and universally esteemed. He was elected Coronor [sic] a year and a half before his death and was still holding the position when he died.
He was made a Master Mason in Pomeroy Lodge, No. 164, January 12th, 1865, exalted to the Royal Arch in Pomeroy Chapter, No. 80, at Pomeroy. Received the Council degrees in Moriah Council No. 32, at Gallipolis, Ohio, Nov. 16th, 1866. Was Knighted in Ohio Valley Commandery at Pomeroy 1870. He was an Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite Mason.
He has presided as Worshipful Master, High Priest, T. I. M. and Em. Commander and at the time of his death he was Recorder of Council No. 12, of which he was a member.
His funeral took place, and was largely attended, March 8th, 1893, from his residence and was under the direction of LaFayette Lodge F. & A. M. of which he was a member.
Isn't this a wonderful write-up about Homer? There is a mistake regarding Homer's Civil War service though. He didn't enlist in the 4th Virginia Infantry. He actually enlisted in the 4th Regiment West Virginia Infantry.

I've read an obituary for Homer in the Zanesville Daily Courier Newspaper, which contained some great information. But it didn't contain these details of Homer's life as a Mason.

I'm very glad I found the Proceedings of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of the State of Ohio at its Sixty-Third Annual Grand Assembly on Google.com. It has given me another glimpse into the rich and interesting life of my 2nd great-granduncle, Dr. Homer Clark Waterman.

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved






1 Proceedings of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters of the State of Ohio at its Sixty-Third Annual Grand Assembly, Issues 63-65, By Royal and Select Masters (Masonic order). Grand Council of the State of Ohio, 1893

Friday, January 17, 2014

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for January 17, 2014

Yellow Poppies
My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. 52 Ancestors Challenge: Week 2 Recap by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small
  2. The comforts of home AND A full day of DNA! by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
  3. Sepia Saturday: Making Do by Wendy, author of Jollett Etc.
  4. Write Your Family History – And Send it to the Library of Congress! by James Sweany for the Library of Congress Blog
  5. Where in the World... is Colorado? by Jen Baldwin, author of Ancestral Breezes
  6. Official RootsTech 2014 news magazine via Flipboard AND What's Net Neutrality, and WHY you should care by Pat Richley-Erickson, author of Dear Myrtle
  7. This Newsletter is Eighteen Years Old! AND World War I Prisoner of War Cards Available Online by Dick Eastman, author of Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter
  8. My 8th Blogiversary by Miriam J. Robbins, author of AnceStories: The Stories of My Ancestors
  9. #52 Ancestors Meets Up With #Crafting Genealogy by Cindy Freed, author of Cindy Freed's Genealogy Circle
  10. Happy New Year! Some blog changes, and a great new resource... by Cate Kunzi, author of Burning River Genealogy
  11. Looking Back, Looking Forward by Michael Judson for FamilySearch Blog
  12. Update #2 - (Finally) A Response from the City Manager by Renate, author of Into the LIGHT
  13. DNA or Dear Neighborly Ancestors by Susan Clark, author of Nolichucky Roots
  14. A Blogshocking Revelation by Sally Knudsen, author of SallySearches
  15. Using Microsoft Word with Blogger by Tony Proctor, author of Parallax View
  16. Headstones and Distant Burials (Tuesday's Tip) by Judy Webster, author of Genealogy Leftovers

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Past Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Monday, January 13, 2014

52 Ancestors: #2 ~ Amanda Melvina Carlisle

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.

Amanda Melvina Carlisle

This is a photo of Amanda Melvina Carlisle, my maternal 3rd great-grandmother. Doesn't she have a sweet face? She looks like she was a kind and gentle woman.

Amanda was born on 31 October 1819 in Ohio. On 9 July 1835, she married my 3rd great-grandfather, Moses Augustine Webster, in Meigs County, Ohio. Here is their marriage record.1

Webster, Moses and Amanda Carlisle Marriage Record Cropped

Moses and Amanda were the parents of eight children:
  1. Ebenezer Perry Carlisle Webster (11 August 1838 – 6 May 1915) [my 2nd great-grandfather]
  2. Asbury Bateman Webster (20 October 1840 – 2 December 1849)
  3. Watson Emery Webster (27 May 1843 – 26 January 1882)
  4. George Washington Webster (8 September 1845 – 11 March 1927)
  5. Basil Marion Webster (22 January 1848 – 6 March 1919)
  6. Mary Irene (Irena) Webster (28 April 1850 – 11 February 1853)
  7. Albert Gallitan Byers Webster (26 September 1858 – 22 February 1862)
  8. Fred Lincoln Webster (28 October 1863 – 21 August 1877)
I wish the marriage record for Moses and Amanda had listed Amanda's parents, because that's been a bit of a brick wall for me. Just who were Amanda's parents?

According to the History And Genealogy of the Gov. John Webster Family of Connecticut,2 Amanda's parents were Basil and Arena Carlisle. Unfortunately, there aren't any sources listed in the book to prove this information.

I've also seen Amanda's parents listed as Basil Carlisle and Nancy Burnes on some Ancestry.com family trees.

Amanda passed away on 29 September 1871 in Blairstown, Benton, Iowa. I wondered if her death certificate would help me find out who her parents were, but it turns out that pre-1904 death certificates in Iowa don't list the parents of the decedent.

So, it looks like I will have to find other records to prove just who Amanda's parents really were.

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved



1 "Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-1994," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-18059-120369-5?cc=1614804&wc=M94Q-K4F:1317686713 : accessed 09 Jan 2014), Meigs > Marriage records 1819-1852 vol 1.

2 Webster, William Holcomb, and Melville Reuben Webster. "Chapter 26." History and Genealogy of the Gov. John Webster Family of Connecticut. 1st ed. Vol. 1. Rochester, NY: E.R. Andrews Print., 1915. 618. Print.

Friday, January 10, 2014

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for January 10, 2014


Happy New Year! I hope you've all enjoyed your Christmas and New Year's holidays.

This is the first Fab Finds post for 2014. Today's list includes blog posts from the past week or two.

My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks AND 52 Ancestors Challenge: Week 1 Recap AND Cousin Bait and the 52 Ancestors Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small
  2. Save FamilySearch Catalog Docs to Google Drive AND Use Tree Connect to Add Sources to Family Tree by Lineagekeeper, author of Family History With The Lineagekeeper
  3. Introducing the Autosomal DNA Segment Analyzer AND X-Chromosome Matching at Family Tree DNA by Roberta Estes, author of DNAeXplained – Genetic Genealogy
  4. New Beginnings by Julie Goucher, author of Anglers Rest
  5. Find A Grave Changes in Suggested Edits AND Reflections is Having a Contest, Right Here, Right Now! by Carol, author of Reflections From the Fence
  6. New England GeneaBloggers RootsTech Bash by Heather Wilkinson Rojo, author of Nutfield Genealogy
  7. RootsTech 2014 Live Streamed Sessions - Watch for FREE from Home by Randy Seaver, author of Genea-Musings
  8. United States Passport Applications available on Familysearch.org! by Kate Challis, author of Czech Out Your Ancestors!
  9. It’s a win! ANd X marks the spot by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
  10. How to Get Around Those “No Family Tree” Cousins on AncestryDNA by Kerry Scott, author of Clue Wagon
  11. RootsTech 2014 and Flipboard—A Great Way to See What’s Happening by Devin Ashby for FamilySearch Blog
  12. Friday's Faces From the Past - Keeping Clues in Place by Laura Cosgrove Lorenzana, author of The Last Leaf On This Branch
  13. We Have a New Home! by Lynn Palermo, author of The Family History Writing Challenge
  14. Family Tree Portrait Pedigree AND Two New Enhancements to the FamilySearch Catalog by Lynne C. VanWagenen for FamilySearch Blog
  15. Wikipedia and Online Newspaper Research for Genealogy by Kenneth R. Marks, author of The Ancestor Hunt
  16. British Red Cross volunteers records to be digitised by Lenore Frost, author of The Empire Called and I Answered
  17. Ohio Genealogical Society's Annual Writing Competition for 2014 by Julie Cahill Tarr, author of Julie's Genealogy & History Hub
  18. Setting and Achieving Your Genealogy Goals in 2014 by Diane Haddad – Genealogy Insider for Family Tree Magazine Blog
  19. Update on Destroyed Records in Franklin County, NC by Renate, author of Into the LIGHT

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere These Past Two Weeks

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
  • A Special Family History Christmas Gift – My daughter hand-stitched our Webster ancestors' immigration route onto a map, framed it and titled the map "The Webster Family…There And Back Again." It's a beautiful and thoughtful gift!
  • The Engle Family Postcard Adventure – The story of how I came into possession of over 60 postcards from the early 1900s that were written to my 2nd great-grandaunt and her husband.
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

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