Friday, August 30, 2013

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for August 30, 2013

Yellow Poppies
My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Jump on board my time machine – I’m heading back! by Cindy Freed's Genealogy Circle
  2. Why I Began Researching My Family History by JAK Genealogy
  3. Blogoversary #5 and Going Strong! by Climbing My Family Tree
  4. 52 Questions in 52 Weeks by Steve Anderson for FamilySearch Blog
  5. The 5 Best Free S‪ites for Online Newspaper Research for Genealogy by The Ancestor Hunt
  6. Validation! by GeneaJourneys
  7. The Bloggers' Geneameme by Geniaus
  8. "Who Do You Think You Are?": Charlemagne Connections and English Roots by Diane Haddad for Genealogy Insider
  9. Interview with Josh Taylor: Big News from FGS by Thomas MacEntee for Hack Genealogy
  10. Mystery Monday: More than Meets the Eye by Many Branches, One Tree
  11. Pictures Too Pale by A Hundred Years Ago
  12. He was named after whom? by Ancestoring
  13. The Next, Expected News by A Family Tapestry
  14. Fleshing out a Family History Story by Bridging the Past
  15. Sonia Bajcz Diamond: Living in Shklyn and the Senkevychivka Ghetto (Part 3: 1936-1942) by Lara's Family Search
  16. My First Blogiversary! by Yvonne's Genealogy Blog
  17. Exploring Your Ancestors' World with Geography by Jen Baldwin for Archives.com
  18. Thankful Thursday - Putting the FAMILY in Genealogy and Family History by The Last Leaf On This Branch
  19. Watertown Free Library, MA -- Remember When it was in the News? by Life From The Roots

New Blog Discovery

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Photo Blog and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!


© 2013 Copyright by Jana Last

Friday, August 23, 2013

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for August 23, 2013

IMG_0480
My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. BYU–Idaho Introduces a New Online Degree in Family History Research by Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter
  2. Part 5 of 5: More Family Lines of Fraser Slaves in South Carolina by Into the Briar Patch: A Family Memoir
  3. Terms of use: Google Maps & Earth by The Legal Genealogist
  4. TERWILLIGER SOUVENIR ALBUM - One Year Blogiversary!! by Terwilliger Souvenir Album
  5. My Dinner with Judy! by Genealogy Certification: My Personal Journal
  6. Have you thought of quitting the blog scene? by Leaves For Trees
  7. Sepia Saturday: Eat - Pray – Love by Jollett Etc.
  8. Using the Mexican Border Crossing Records in Your Mexican Ancestry Research by Mexican Genealogy
  9. Who do I look like? by An Unexpected Discovery
  10. Wisdom Wednesday: My kind of day by Nuts From the Family Tree
  11. NARA Virtural Genealogy Fair Schedule by Adventures in Genealogy Education
  12. Don’t Stereotype a Genealogist by Genealogy & History News
  13. Dear Mother: Family Letters and Your Genealogy by Gena Philibert-Ortega for GenealogyBank Blog
  14. Flee, Fight — or Hide? Bruno Bettleheim, Anne Frank & My Family by Freud's Butcher
  15. Lost and Found, Hide-n-Seek in Ypsilanti by Family Stories
  16. FGS and RootsTech Events To Be Held In Tandem 2015 by The Olive Tree Genealogy
  17. FGS Conference Blog Compendium by Genea-Musings
  18. Follow Friday - Arkiv Digital - free this weekend by Cousin Linda
  19. Coming to Terms with History - Musings on Ellis's Service in the Civil War by My Ancestors and Me
  20. Children of the Corn by SallySearches

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!


© 2013 Copyright by Jana Last

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Thanks for Traveling Frederick! – It's Esther's Turn to Travel

This is part of a series of posts in which I share the documents relating to the travels of Watson (Frederick) Emory Webster and his family.


Fred and Esther Webster with Carlota and Edna Webster
The Webster Family
L to R - Frederick, Carlota, Edna, Esther


I wonder if Esther (Matus Villatoro) Webster, would have traveled as much as she did during her life if her husband, Frederick, a.k.a "The Traveling Dentist," hadn't traveled as much as he did. I've decided to include the travels of Frederick's wife and children as part of this series of posts called "Thanks for Traveling Frederick!"

Today I'm sharing a passenger list1 from October 19, 1911 showing Esther and her daughter Carlota traveling alone. Where was Frederick? Was he already in the United States? Were Esther and Carlota traveling to meet him? I wouldn't be surprised if that were the case. I wonder how Esther felt traveling by herself with a one year old child.


Passenger List for Esther and Carlota Webster 1911

According to this passenger list, Esther and Carlota sailed on the S.S. Morro Castle. I found a picture of this ship. I think it's fascinating to see what this ship looked like.


S. S. Morro Castle
S.S. Morro Castle ~ Wikimedia Commons
No Copyright

What can we glean from the passenger list (above)?
  1. Esther and Carlota sailed on the S.S. Morro Castle
  2. Port of Departure – Veracruz, Mexico
  3. Date of Departure – October 19, 1911
  4. On line 2 we see Carlota Webster listed.  She was Frederick and Esther's oldest child.
  5. Carlota's Age was 1
  6. Carlota's Nationality – United States citizen
  7. On line 3 we see Esther Webster listed.
  8. Esther's age was 20
  9. Esther was married
  10. Esther's Nationality – United States citizen
  11. Esther's Race – Mexican
I think it's interesting that Esther's nationality (Country of which citizen or subject) was first listed as Mexico.  Then that was crossed out and U.S. was written over Mexico.  Also, in the column of Race for Esther, Mexican was crossed out and U.S. was written in.

Was Esther's nationality (Country of which citizen or subject) changed from Mexico to U.S. because she automatically became a U.S. citizen when she married Frederick Webster in 1910? I found the following information helpful regarding Esther and her citizenship status.

In the article
Seven Keys to Understanding Naturalization Records at Ancestry.com,2 the following is stated:
'"Derivative" citizenship was granted to wives and minor children of naturalized men. From 1790 to 1922, wives of naturalized men automatically became citizens. This also meant that an alien woman who married a U.S. citizen automatically became a citizen.'
In a separate article, I found the following regarding marriage and citizenship of alien women. Marian L. Smith stated in her article "Any woman who is now or may hereafter be married . . ." Women and Naturalization, ca. 1802-1940 at Archives.gov:3
"In other cases, the immigrant woman suddenly became a citizen when she and her U.S. citizen fiance were declared "man and wife." In this case her proof of citizenship was a combination of two documents: the marriage certificate and her husband's birth record or naturalization certificate. If such an alien woman also had minor alien children, they, too, derived U.S. citizenship from the marriage. As minors, they instantly derived citizenship from the "naturalization-by-marriage" of their mother. If the marriage took place abroad, the new wife and her children could enter the United States for the first time as citizens."

This wasn't the only time I found Esther on a passenger list. I'll be sharing more documents from Esther's travels in future posts.

Thanks for reading!



© 2013 Copyright by Jana Last




1 Source Citation: Year: 1911; ; Microfilm Serial: T715; Microfilm Roll: T715_1763; Line: 3; ; Page Number: 180. Source Information: Ancestry.com. New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
2 "Seven Keys to Understanding Naturalization Records." Ancestry.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Aug. 2013.
3 Smith, Marian L. "Prologue: Selected Articles." Prologue: Selected Articles. National Archives, Summer 1998. Web. 20 Aug. 2013.

Friday, August 16, 2013

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for August 16, 2013

Cropped White Poppy 600dpi Cropped
My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Surprise! A Stash of Family Papers has been Discovered! by Nutfield Genealogy
  2. Online records loss in West Virginia by The Legal Genealogist
  3. Ain't Nothing Like the Real Thing Baby!-Searching Original Records by Carolina Girl Genealogy
  4. Uncle Heinrich Margheim, I Never Knew You by Grace and Glory
  5. Serious Thoughts To Quit Blogging by Heritage Happens
  6. She saved napkins? by Who Knew?
  7. PAGE 10 - CARNIVAL & BALL TICKETS, 1882 and 1883 by Terwilliger Souvenir Album
  8. Connecting With Cousins by i-Descend
  9. Legacy Family Tree 8 Revealed - New Wall Charts and options by Legacy Family Tree News
  10. How to Identify an Ancestor of Uncertain Identity by Jenny Tonks for Ask a Genealogist
  11. Law and Order: Special Cousins Unit by Clue Wagon
  12. Rudolph Valentino and Dad AND Hollywood Comes Calling Again! by GeneaJourneys
  13. Using the 1930 Mexican Census to Find Your Mexican Ancestors by Mexican Genealogy
  14. Named to Family Tree Magazine's 101 Best Websites List Again! by The Chart Chick
  15. Genealogy By the States – Week 32 – Minnesota by Julie's Genealogy & History Hub
  16. First Time Ever National Archives Virtual Genealogy Fair by The Olive Tree Genealogy
  17. Impressive Developments in the FamilySearch Library Catalog by Genealogy's Star
  18. Back to Where She Came From by The Family Connection
  19. Upcoming Series - Family History Through the Alphabet by Digging Up Roots
  20. 12-Book Giveaway on August 29th! by Fieldstone Common

New Blog Discovery

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Photo Blog, and Vintage Postcard Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!


© 2013 Copyright by Jana Last

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Carl Albert Gillberg – Leaving from Liverpool

Gillberg, Carl Albert - UK Outward Passenger Lists 1890-1960

I love immigration and naturalization records. This amazing UK, Outward Passenger List1 is from Ancestry.com. It shows my great-grandfather, Carl Albert Gillberg, with his step-daughter Judith, and daughter Margaret. See their names and information in the red box? Here's a close-up view.

Gillberg, Carl Albert - UK Outward Passenger Lists 1890-1960 Cropped

Information gleaned from this document:
  • Name of Ship – Canada
  • Date of Departure – September 9, 1909
  • Where Bound – Quebec and Montreal
  • Carl's port at which he contracted to land – Montreal
  • Port of Departure – Liverpool
  • Carl's profession – Mechanic
  • Carl's age – 27 years old
  • Judith's age – 11 years old
  • Margaret's age – 7 years old

So, of course looking at this document raises some questions for me.
  1. Carl and his family lived in Eskilstuna, Sweden. He and his daughters would have had to travel to Liverpool, England, the port from which they left for the United States. How did they get to Liverpool? And where did they stay before the ship left?
  2. Why was Carl's profession listed as a mechanic? On two other documents he is listed as a tinsmith.
  3. Carl's 1924 Declaration of Intention states that he entered the United States on September 18, 1909 at the Port of Chicago in Illinois. But on a different passenger list, there is a handwritten note near Carl's name stating the following – Detroit 9-19-09 C. P. Ry. Through which port did Carl enter the United States? The Google Map below shows the relation of Montreal to Detroit and Chicago.
Googlemap showing Carl Gillberg's Port of Arrival in Montreal Canada

I did a Google search for "C P Railway" and Canadian Pacific Railway came up as an option. Here's a map from the Library of Congress that shows some of the Canadian Pacific Railway lines, particularly from Montreal, Canada westward. It appears that the ports of Detroit and Chicago were part of the Canadian Pacific Railway lines. So, now I'm not sure if Carl entered the United States at the Port of Detroit or the Port of Chicago.

Library of Congress Map of Canadian Pacific Railway Lines

Unfortunately, these questions may remain unanswered. But what I do know is that Carl and his daughters did travel across the Atlantic Ocean in 1909, leaving Carl's wife, Hilda, and another daughter, Naomi, back in Sweden. Hilda and Naomi would emigrate from Sweden to the United States the following year.

The family settled in Salt Lake City, Utah, where my grandmother, Ingrid Anna Gillberg, was born. Years later they moved to California, where Carl and Hilda became citizens of the United States of America.

Thanks for reading!


© 2013 Copyright by Jana Last



1 Ancestry.com. UK, Outward Passenger Lists, 1890-1960[database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012. Original data: Board of Trade: Commercial and Statistical Department and successors: Outwards Passenger Lists. BT27. Records of the Commercial, Companies, Labour, Railways and Statistics Departments. Records of the Board of Trade and of successor and related bodies. The National Archives, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, England.

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Hilma Elizabeth (Carlsson) Taylor

Hilma E. Carlsson Taylor and Charles A. Taylor Tombstone

This is the tombstone of my great-grandaunt Hilma Elizabeth (Carlsson) Taylor and her husband Charles Alvin Taylor.

Many thanks go to Alton and Loudonia, Find A Grave volunteers, who took this photo of Hilma and Charles' tombstone.

Hilma was born on June 1, 1888 in Eskilstuna, Sodermanland, Sweden to Johan Erik Carlsson and Karin Johnsson. According to both the 1910 and 1930 federal censuses, Hilma's year of immigration to the United States was 1900.

Hilma married Charles Alvin Taylor on November 16, 1907 in Salt Lake City, Utah. They were the parents of two daughters:
  1. Hazel Hilma Taylor (1909-1977)
  2. Catherine Amy Taylor
I love this photo of Hilma with her sister Hilda Maria (Carlsson) Gillberg. Hilda was my great-grandmother.


Hilda Maria (Carlsson) Gillberg and Sister Hilma Elizabeth (Carlsson) Taylor
Hilda Maria (Carlsson) Gillberg [left]
and Hilma Elizabeth (Carlsson) Taylor [right]

Hilma passed away on June 14, 1976 in Suwannee County, Florida.

To view Hilma's Find A Grave Memorial Page, click HERE.

Thanks for reading!


© 2013 Copyright by Jana Last

Friday, August 9, 2013

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for August 9, 2013

Four Shooting Stars from Microsoft Office Images
My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. A guest photo! by Ancestoring's Orphan Photos
  2. Updates to Chronicling America Historic Newspapers – Follow Friday by Sassy Jane Genealogy
  3. Family History Expos 10th Anniversary in Colorado Springs by Grace and Glory
  4. San Francisco Chinatown Bubonic Plague Records AND Five Fabulous Years! by The Educated Genealogist
  5. Legacy Family Tree 8 Revealed - Origins and Migration Reports by Legacy Family Tree News
  6. 100,000 Family History Books now Online by Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter
  7. RootsTech Rowdies in Google+ AND Ancestor 'Selfies'....Got Any? by Journeys Past
  8. Tarnow Calling by Freud's Butcher
  9. The Wait is Over - The 1921 Canada Census is Here! by Looking 4 Ancestors
  10. Competition: Free Photo Consultation with The Photo Detective by Emma for MyHeritage Blog
  11. Sepia Saturday - Doorways to Life by Family History Fun
  12. Georgia Roots - I Knew It! I Knew It! by Celebrating Family Stories
  13. Military periodicals online by The Empire Called and I Answered
  14. My Postmortem by Sally Searches
  15. Contest to Win a Free Copy of Family Tree Maker 2012 by Genea-Musings
  16. The Letters on Ebay by Life from The Roots
  17. Employment Applications can be a great resource. by Letters to My Grandparents
  18. The Chimney Fell off the House, and Mama Died. 1906. by Ancestors from the Attic
  19. Fantastic Friday: Hotel LaRose Mystery Solved by Many Branches, One Tree

New Blog Discovery

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Vintage Postcard, and Photo Blog Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!


© 2013 Copyright by Jana Last

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Just Sitting Around…on a Shed

This fun photo was found in one of my Grandma Ingrid Gillberg's Books of Remembrance. I don't know if the structure these girls are sitting on is actually a shed or not. I'm just guessing about that. Is it a shed, a garage, or something else? What do you think?

Just why were my Grandma Ingrid (second from the left), three of her sisters, and a friend, sitting there having their picture taken? And who took the picture?

A friend Anabelle McKendrick, Ingrid, Ida, Ruby, and Edith Gillberg about 1926

Here's a zoomed in view of these darling girls.

A friend Anabelle McKendrick, Ingrid, Ida, Ruby, and Edith Gillberg about 1926

This is what my Grandma Ingrid wrote under the photo in her Book of Remembrance.

Ingrid's Writing Under A Photo of her and her sisters

Transcription:
From left to right a friend
Annabelle McKendrick, Myself
Ida, Ruby and Edith. Taken
by our home on Grand Ave
Salt Lake City, Utah
about 1926
In 1926 my Grandma Ingrid and her three sisters in this photo would have been the following ages:

Ingrid - about 13 years old
Ida - about 10 years old
Ruby - about 6 years old
Edith - about 10 years old

Ida and Edith were twins. Did you notice how they were dressed alike? Well, except for the shoes. And I like how little Ruby is sitting there with her arms folded. And notice how Annabelle, Ingrid's friend, has her arm around Ingrid? Annabelle seems to be holding something in her lap too. I wonder what it is.

Don't these girls look happy…just sitting around…on a shed?

Thanks for reading!


© 2013 Copyright by Jana Last

Friday, August 2, 2013

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for August 2, 2013

Four Shooting Stars from Microsoft Office Images
My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. GenealogyBank permissions clarified AND A signature moment by The Legal Genealogist
  2. How Did I Miss This? by Past-Present-Future
  3. FamilySearch Family Tree Adds Important New ‘Attach Record’ Feature by Tom Kemp for GenealogyBank Blog
  4. Part 3: A Third Family Line of Fraser Slaves in South Carolina by Into the Briar Patch: A Family Memoir
  5. Matrilineal Monday: Mary Elizabeth Bellangee AND Military Monday: Wallace Partridge, Civil War Soldier by Know Their Stories
  6. Those Places Thursday -- Alcatraz Island by Telling Their Tale. The Stories of My Ancestors
  7. Old Reader is Going Private - Time to Choose a New RSS Reader by The Olive Tree Genealogy
  8. Family Stories To Laugh About... Someday by Valerie Elkins for Family Storytelling
  9. Can You Chart the Heart? AND The BYU Family History and Genealogy Conference is Going South by The Single Leaf
  10. Tombstone Tuesday: Need Bloopers for Class on Cemetery Photography AND Tech Tuesday: How Can I Get a Response from FindAGrave by A Patient Genealogist
  11. How I Use OneNote to Organize My Genealogy by Elyse's Genealogy Blog
  12. Freud’s Butcher, Year One: Five Highlights by Freud's Butcher
  13. Immigrants, History, and the Second City: Resources for Chicago Genealogy by Jennifer Holik for Archives.com
  14. Favorite Records: Vertical Files by Begin with 'Craft'
  15. Worked out what I can do... by Geniaus
  16. Coffins, Urns, and Ziplock Bags by The Ancestry Insider
  17. Photo of Grandma and Me by A Hundred Years Ago
  18. Genealogy From The Blueberry Patch by Sally Searches
  19. Happy Blogoversary to Me! AND Friday Funny ~ The Flavor "Graveyard" by Nutfield Genealogy

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Genealogy, Vintage Postcard, and Photo Blog Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Photo Journal

Thanks for reading!


© 2013 Copyright by Jana Last

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